New PLOS pricing test could signal end of scientists paying to publish free papers | Science | AAAS

“PLOS, the nonprofit publisher that in 2003 pioneered the open-access business model of charging authors to publish scientific articles so they are immediately free to all, this week rolled out an alternative model that could herald the end of the author-pays era. One of the new options shifts the cost of publishing open-access (OA) articles in its two most selective journals to institutions, charging them a fixed annual fee; any researcher at that institution could then publish in the PLOS journals at no additional charge….”

CAP Model FAQ – PLOS

An FAQ on the PLOS Community Action Publishing (CAP) program.

“In the case of PLOS Medicine and PLOS Biology, the community goal is to cover the costs of the journals (plus a 10% capped margin) by equitably distributing cost, rather than have individual authors pay the high APCs required to cover the cost highly selective publishing. Members of the collective receive the “private benefit” of publishing in both journals with no fees. Authors from non-member institutions are subject to “non-member fees” which increase considerably year-on-year to encourage participation in the collective….”

New APC-free Open Access agreements test alternative funding models – The Official PLOS Blog

“Under the flat fee agreement, which begins on January 1, 2021, annual fixed prices will cover uncapped publishing in five PLOS journals[1] for corresponding authors affiliated with participating Jisc institutions as well as custom reporting and collaboration on future reporting standards initiatives. The PLOS Community Action Publishing agreement, facilitates uncapped publishing in PLOS’ two highly selective journals[2] through a collective action model. Both corresponding and contributing authors affiliated with participating Jisc institutions are eligible. The model itself is predicated on cost recovery, capped margins, and redistributing revenues above target back to community members….”

Caselaw Access Project Nominated for a Webby: Vote for Us! | Library Innovation Lab

“The Caselaw Access Project has been nominated for one of the 24th Annual Webby Awards. We’re honored to be named alongside this year’s other nominees, including friends and leaders in the field like the Knight First Amendment Institute.

CAP makes 6.7 million cases freely available online from the collections of Harvard Law School Library. We’re creating new ways to access the law, such as our case browser, bulk data and downloads for research scholars, and graphs that show how words are used over time….”

Caselaw Access Project Nominated for a Webby: Vote for Us! | Library Innovation Lab

“The Caselaw Access Project has been nominated for one of the 24th Annual Webby Awards. We’re honored to be named alongside this year’s other nominees, including friends and leaders in the field like the Knight First Amendment Institute.

CAP makes 6.7 million cases freely available online from the collections of Harvard Law School Library. We’re creating new ways to access the law, such as our case browser, bulk data and downloads for research scholars, and graphs that show how words are used over time….”

Clinic Files SCOTUS Brief w/Caselaw Access Project, Arguing for Unburdened Access to Law | Cyberlaw Clinic

“This week, the Cyberlaw Clinic filed an amicus brief (pdf) in the United States Supreme Court in the case, Georgia, et. al v. Public.Resource.Org Inc, No. 18-1150. The Clinic filed the brief on behalf of the Caselaw Access Project (CAP), a team of legal researchers, software developers, and law librarians based in the Harvard Law Library. The Clinic’s brief advocates for upholding the Eleventh Circuit’s holding in favor of the respondent, Public.Resource.Org (PRO), arguing for an easy, universal, and unrestricted access to the law. The case raises one major copyright concern: does the “government edicts doctrine” extend to—and therefore render uncopyrightable—materials that lack the force of, but are published alongside, and sometimes even inextricably mixed with, the law?…”

Introducing Lawvocado: The Caselaw Access Project Newsletter | Library Innovation Lab

“Today we’re sharing Lawvocado, our newsletter from the Caselaw Access Project.

Delivered right to your inbox, Lawvocado will be the source for news and developments from the Caselaw Access Project and stories in our orbit.

Subscribe and catch up with our first issue….”

Computational Support for Statutory Interpretation with Caselaw Access Project Data | Library Innovation Lab

“This post is about a research paper (preprint) on sentence retrieval for statutory interpretation that we presented at the International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2019) held in June at Montreal, Canada. The paper describes some of our recent work on computational methods for statutory interpretation carried out at the University of Pittsburgh. The idea is to focus on vague statutory concepts and enable a program to retrieve sentences that explain the meaning of such concepts. The Library Innovation Lab’s Caselaw Access Project (CAP) provides an ideal corpus of case law that is needed for such work….”