Open Pedagogy Incubator

“The Open Pedagogy Incubator is a semester-long program designed to incentivize faculty to go beyond the first step in open education – adopting open course materials – to implement multiple open-enabled practices in their courses. Modeled on our successful Alt-Textbook program and the 2019 pilot of our OPEN Incubator, the Open Pedagogy Incubator brings together a cohort of faculty instructors to develop competencies in open pedagogy through a series of hands-on workshops, curated readings, and cohort discussions.

Program members gain knowledge, skills, and support in three main areas:

The potential of open pedagogy as a way to center faculty expertise, student agency, and social justice

Current and emerging models of open pedagogical practice including renewable assignments

Concrete processes for implementing open pedagogy in courses they are leading….”

Using Open Pedagogy to Engage LIS Students: A Case Study

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION This case study describes the experimental use of open pedagogy to teach graduate-level library and information science (LIS) students in a newly developed course on international and comparative librarianship. Open pedagogy is the theory and practice of engaging students as creators of course content rather than requiring them to be consumers of it. In this case, students created an open textbook; each student authored a chapter about libraries and the field of librarianship in an assigned non-North American country. The textbook was developed under a Creative Commons license as an open educational resource (OER), allowing free use, remixing, and repurposing in future sections of the course or in similar courses offered in LIS programs at other institutions. METHOD The author used student perception data collected from a voluntary survey instrument and from a compulsory reflection paper assignment to assess the efficacy of implementing an open pedagogy framework in the course. RESULTS Collected data suggests the experiment produced results perceived by the majority of students as efficacious in the given context. DISCUSSION Students were enthusiastic in their embrace of creating renewable versus disposable coursework, and they expressed great satisfaction with the course outcomes of contributing to the professional literature, building the discipline’s nascent OER record, and having a publication to feature in their curricular and professional dossiers. CONCLUSIONS Massive shifts in teaching and learning demand radical transitions. Open pedagogy is a response to that demand that requires additional research and experimentation.

 

‘Better Every Semester’: How Faculty Use Open Educational Resources to Improve Courses | EdSurge News

“Much of the attention that open educational resources have earned focuses on their low cost. After all, a free or inexpensive alternative to a pricey commercial textbook can make a big difference for students at institutions like Salt Lake Community College, who are “mostly not affluent,” Hardy says.

 

But OER advocates think open access course materials hold another kind of promise for students, too. Designed to be flexible and alterable, educators and students can continually test how well they work and improve them as necessary, “ensuring the course materials are better every semester than they were the semester before,” says David Wiley, chief academic officer of Lumen Learning, a company that sells low-cost open textbooks and courseware….”

View of Editing for equity: Understanding instructor motivations for integrating cross-disciplinary Wikipedia assignments | First Monday

Abstract:  Advances in both research and advocacy have demonstrated how Wikipedia-based education, as a movement, has grown exponentially in the last 10 years. As a result, academics know a lot more about specific learning outcomes that Wikipedia assignments might enable and are more familiar with issues of social equity (e.g., systemic biases related to gender) in the encyclopedia. Despite these advances, little scholarship has focused on instructor motivations for utilizing Wikipedia assignments. This paper reports on a survey of over 100 instructors engaged in Wikipedia-based education practices in order to contribute a cross-disciplinary picture of instructor motivations. Our findings suggest that instructors take up Wikipedia-based assignments for a number of reasons beyond learning objectives: including social influence (being inspired by others), providing students an opportunity to contribute to public knowledge, and motivations related to addressing social equity, among others. Participants who are directly motivated to address issues of social equity rationalize their pedagogy as opportunities for activism or advocacy, professional identity, and critical pedagogy. Finally, this paper provides recommendations to Wikipedia Education stakeholders in regards to the finding that instructors’ professional identities play a significant role in their motivation to address issues of social equity.

 

View of Editing for equity: Understanding instructor motivations for integrating cross-disciplinary Wikipedia assignments | First Monday

Abstract:  Advances in both research and advocacy have demonstrated how Wikipedia-based education, as a movement, has grown exponentially in the last 10 years. As a result, academics know a lot more about specific learning outcomes that Wikipedia assignments might enable and are more familiar with issues of social equity (e.g., systemic biases related to gender) in the encyclopedia. Despite these advances, little scholarship has focused on instructor motivations for utilizing Wikipedia assignments. This paper reports on a survey of over 100 instructors engaged in Wikipedia-based education practices in order to contribute a cross-disciplinary picture of instructor motivations. Our findings suggest that instructors take up Wikipedia-based assignments for a number of reasons beyond learning objectives: including social influence (being inspired by others), providing students an opportunity to contribute to public knowledge, and motivations related to addressing social equity, among others. Participants who are directly motivated to address issues of social equity rationalize their pedagogy as opportunities for activism or advocacy, professional identity, and critical pedagogy. Finally, this paper provides recommendations to Wikipedia Education stakeholders in regards to the finding that instructors’ professional identities play a significant role in their motivation to address issues of social equity.

 

Copyright and enabling remote learning and research during the Covid-19 crisis

“In the face of COVID-19, public libraries, schools, universities and research have moved online overnight. Educational establishments are working to support learning, teaching and research remotely and researchers and students are trying to access content from libraries which are now closed. Unfortunately, remote supply of information during this crisis is being inhibited by copyright law. Copyright limits how much information can be remotely supplied for educational purposes – namely that the amount has to be “fair” (usually interpreted as, for example, a few lines of a poem, or a single book chapter) or is subject to licences, which are not designed for the current unprecedented situation we all face. For example, under copyright law the following activities that are swiftly being put in place would be infringements: ? Teachers scanning entire books for hastily arranged online courses. ? Public libraries arranging the online reading of books as part of children’s story time. ? Researchers wishing to access entire works that are only available on library premises, such as paper books or certain eBooks….”

Public Statement: Fair Use & Emergency Remote Teaching & Research – Google Docs

“This Statement is meant to provide clarity for U.S. colleges and universities about how copyright law applies to the many facets of remote teaching and research in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak. We write this as copyright specialists at colleges, universities, and other organizations supporting higher education in the U.S. and Canada who work every day with faculty, staff, and librarians to enable them to make ethical and legal choices about copyright issues in online teaching.   

 
The United States is in a time of crisis. As of this writing, more than 200 universities and colleges have moved to remote teaching. These moves aim to promote public health by slowing the spread of the disease, while maintaining at least some of the important functions higher education plays in teaching, learning, and research. We have heard concerns that copyright may pose impediments to a rapid shift to remote instruction, or conversely, that copyright is not relevant. While legal obligations do not automatically dissolve in the face of a public health crisis, U.S. copyright law is, thankfully, well equipped to provide the flexibility necessary for the vast majority of remote learning needed at this time….”

Public Statement: Fair Use & Emergency Remote Teaching & Research – Google Docs

“This Statement is meant to provide clarity for U.S. colleges and universities about how copyright law applies to the many facets of remote teaching and research in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak. We write this as copyright specialists at colleges, universities, and other organizations supporting higher education in the U.S. and Canada who work every day with faculty, staff, and librarians to enable them to make ethical and legal choices about copyright issues in online teaching.   

 
The United States is in a time of crisis. As of this writing, more than 200 universities and colleges have moved to remote teaching. These moves aim to promote public health by slowing the spread of the disease, while maintaining at least some of the important functions higher education plays in teaching, learning, and research. We have heard concerns that copyright may pose impediments to a rapid shift to remote instruction, or conversely, that copyright is not relevant. While legal obligations do not automatically dissolve in the face of a public health crisis, U.S. copyright law is, thankfully, well equipped to provide the flexibility necessary for the vast majority of remote learning needed at this time….”