Open Context: Web-based research data publishing

“Open Context reviews, edits, annotates, publishes and archives research data and digital documentation. We publish your data and preserve it with leading digital libraries. We take steps beyond archiving to richly annotate and integrate your analyses, maps and media. This links your data to the wider world and broadens the impact of your ideas….”

Home – The Alexandria Archive Institute

“The Alexandria Archive Institute is a non-profit technology company that preserves and shares world heritage on the Web, free of charge. Through advocacy, education, research, and technology programs like Open Context, we pioneer ways to open up archaeology and related fields for all….”

“From Campus to Community: Making the Case for Open Access by Bringing ” by Rachel Caldwell, Melanie A. Allen et al.

“Summary: Describes how librarians developed a workshop for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) to help NPOs access peer-reviewed publications behind paywalls, develop skills in searching (information retrieval), and improve awareness of how academic libraries can support community organizations. NPOs who participated gave feedback in a number of ways, from written surveys to short recorded video interviews. With permission, their feedback was used to develop promotional and informational materials intended for the campus about the value of open access to those working in the local community.”

 

 

“From Campus to Community: Making the Case for Open Access by Bringing ” by Rachel Caldwell, Melanie A. Allen et al.

“Summary: Describes how librarians developed a workshop for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) to help NPOs access peer-reviewed publications behind paywalls, develop skills in searching (information retrieval), and improve awareness of how academic libraries can support community organizations. NPOs who participated gave feedback in a number of ways, from written surveys to short recorded video interviews. With permission, their feedback was used to develop promotional and informational materials intended for the campus about the value of open access to those working in the local community.”

 

 

Researchers.One

“Researchers.One is an online platform for scholarly publishing, community building, research collaboration and curation. The Researchers.One platform is founded on the principles that all researchers in all disciplines should have autonomy over their research and its dissemination, authority to decide how best to conduct their research, and access to publish their work and obtain peer feedback.

The platform was founded in 2018 by Harry Crane and Ryan Martin. A more detailed explanation of the vision behind Researchers.One can be found inThe Researchers.One Mission….”

Indonesia nomor 1 untuk publikasi jurnal akses terbuka di dunia: apa artinya bagi ekosistem riset lokal

“With the largest number of OA journals in the world, the knowledge of Indonesian researchers should be able to freely reach the public.

The government has started to realize this.

This is evidenced by the recent Law on National Science and Technology System ( UU Sisnas Science and Technology ) which also began requiring the application of this open access system for research publications to ensure that research results can be enjoyed by the public.

Through this obligation, the government hopes to encourage not only the transparency of the research process, but also innovations and new findings that benefit society….

According to our records, the research publication system in Indonesia since the 1970s has implemented the non-profit principle. At that time research publications were sold for a subscription fee which was usually calculated from the cost of printing only. This system is different from that found in developed countries which are dominated by commercial publishing companies.

This is where Indonesia triumphs over any research ecosystem.

Some that can match it are the Scielo research ecosystem in Brazil, the African Journal Online (AJOL) scientific publishing ecosystem and the Africaxiv from the African continent…..”

OpenlabEC

From Google’s English:  “We are a citizen laboratory in Ecuador, which seeks to generate dialogues and experiences related to digital culture, citizen participation and open knowledge. We define ourselves as activists for the free software movement, popular and critical education, citizen science, privacy, open innovation, the development of computational thinking and the horizontal exchange of knowledge.

We do everything, debates, courses, hackathons, labs, social projects, mentoring, art exhibitions, mapping, conferences, all from an open and collaborative perspective. We want to support the free and digital culture communities of the country, necessary to promote the economy of knowledge and creativity that society needs.

We advise the production of virtual events and innovation processes with academic institutions, the media, NGOs and civil society.

We are a non-profit organization that seeks to generate redistribution and self-management of its processes. We collaborate with different organizations in the country and Latin America related to our same principles.”

Open Online Education Project

“The Open Online Education Project (OOEP) aims to improve online education by:

Developing open-source online educational tools.
Advocating for the publishing of free online education materials
Creating collaborations between institutions to address problems in online education.
Collecting and distributing resources for online education

We are a group of students, faculty, and technologists, growing out of Harvard and MIT, working on online education at the university level. We believe online education naturally lends itself to collaboration and needs further development. OOEP consists of a coalition of projects and partners….”

Good vs. Evil? Finding the Right Mix of For-Profit and Not-for-Profit Services – The Scholarly Kitchen

“The two of us have been debating for some time which services should be controlled directly by the academy and which services are best provided by third-party vendors, many of which operate as for-profit enterprises. Roger has written extensively about this, for example this article and this article, arguing that many academic institutions and their collaborative vehicles have not developed the strategic or governance posture necessary to offer a realistic alternative to commercial enterprises. Joe has analyzed some of the reasons that the academy has outsourced scholarly publishing in particular, largely (but not entirely) to commercial firms. These conversations take place against a backdrop in which some believe that the academy should “should step up to invest in home-grown research infrastructures and cross-institution consortia”, while others, of a free market persuasion, believe that commercial enterprise solves virtually all problems. Not surprisingly, we fall somewhere between the two ends of the continuum — and toggle from left to right and back again depending on circumstances. While we don’t have a prescription for determining which service should fall into what bucket, we have been developing a list of questions to help make these judgments….”