Pharmaceutical companies should publish more research open access – The BMJ

“Pharmaceutical companies fund around half of all biomedical research, but, in contrast to many public funders of research, only two companies (Takeda and Ipsen) mandate that all the research they fund must be published open access. Nevertheless, other pharmaceutical companies, including GlaxoSmithKline, are able to publish up to three quarters of the research they fund open access without a mandate. This is not bad when less than 50% of research overall is published open access….

Open Pharma has produced a position statement on open access that calls for journals to give authors who are publishing research funded by pharmaceutical companies the same rights as authors of research funded by public funders. In the 9 months since its launch, the position statement has gained over 150 endorsements, including eight publisher and 29 pharmaceutical company endorsements.

The liveliest part of the roundtable meeting was when patients called for full open access to research. Patients have not usually been included in debates about open access because they have not been considered to be “end users” of research. Nowadays, not only do patients participate at each stage of the research life cycle, from clinical trial design to establishing patient-reported outcome measurements, but they are also increasingly involved in the creation and curation of scientific studies. Yet patients can access no more than one-quarter of published clinical research. …”

“Pharma are doing ok in terms of open access, but they could be doing more” – insights from the Open Pharma June roundtable meeting – Open Pharma

“Open Pharma Members, Supporters and key Advisers came together to discuss the ways in which the scientific publishing community can make research accessible, discoverable and transparent for patients and the public.

Many organizations are working towards the same goals in terms of transparency, discoverability, accessibility and accountability in scientific publishing, but wouldn’t it be better if these goals were aligned? On 15 June 2020, Open Pharma brought together the different stakeholders in academic publishing for a virtual roundtable meeting with the aim of coordinating their approach to open access models and enhanced content for scientific publications. Following a recap of the January roundtable meeting, attendees discussed the benefits of open access mandates for pharma. A clear definition of what open access is, with regards to Creative Commons licences and publishing embargoes, and a strong communications plan were both shown to be key to the successful implementation of a mandatory open access policy….”

Position statement on open access – Open Pharma

“Our immediate priority is to secure authors publishing company-funded research the same right to publish open access as authors publishing research funded by other sources, so that all research can be made free to read from the date of publication. This would enable pharmaceutical companies to follow the lead of other research funders in requiring all the research they fund to be published with open access, without impacting on journal choice.5-7 In order to provide publishers the time to adapt their policies and protect their copyright interests, any variant of Creative Commons or equivalent licence could be used….

Our long-term goal is to secure authors publishing company-funded research the same terms as authors publishing research funded by other sources, so that all research can be made free to read – and reuse – from the date of publication….”