Can open access publishing be made ‘JUST’ for authors from low-middle income countries? – The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

“OA applies the principles of ‘FAIR’ in its publishing model. Proposed in March 2016 and endorsed by the European commission and the G20, ‘FAIR’ is an acronym for ‘findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable’, intended to more clearly define what is meant by the term ‘open access’ and make the concept easier to discuss [5]. We wondered if the ‘FAIR’ concept can be supported by the philosophy of ‘JUST’ as well, to empower authors especially from the low and middle-income countries (LMICs).

J- Jargon friendly, U- Universal, S- Sharing, T- Transparent….”

Research4Life Landscape and Situation Analysis

“This page summarises the findings of a landscape and situation analysis of trends in the research and scholarly communication landscape in low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs).

The landscape analysis considers three levels of analysis:
• Firstly, it seeks to identify global megatrends relevant to research and international development.
• Then, it narrows the focus to key trends in research in and for LMICs.
• Finally it identifies the key trends in scholarly communication….”

Open access of psychological intervention manuals – Watts – 2020 – World Psychiatry – Wiley Online Library

“In summary, only two studies (7%) reporting results of a psychological treatment for common mental disorders in LMICs provided citations to the exact manual used in the study, and only two (7%) provided open access to the manual.

Access to treatment manuals for psychological interventions is important for the replication and independent scrutiny of study results and for the dissemination of effective interventions.

Change is not only needed but also feasible. For example, two relevant RCTs of psychological treatments were released around the same time of the systematic review3 and were thus not included in our analyses. One included a reference to an online version of the exact manual used8, and the other offered access to a linked training programme to learn the intervention9.

Accessibility to treatment manuals is a key aspect of open science of psychological treatments. Mental health journals and research funders should consider setting up mechanisms that require authors of RCTs to make the psychological treatment manuals they used open access.”

Research and open access from low‐ and middle‐income countries – Newton – 2020 – Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology – Wiley Online Library

“Open access publishing of scientific research could have a significant impact on science, development, and health in LMICs, but it does need support. Established publishing companies could do more to make papers accessible to researchers in LMICs and improve the immediacy of the research. Funders and philanthropic organizations should support the work they fund being open access. Authors should be encouraged to publish in open access journals or those journals that allow free access to research conducted in LMICs, or at least ensure that other researchers and communities have access to their findings for the benefit of communities in these areas.”

NGOs’ experiences of navigating the open… | F1000Research

Abstract:  Grant-led consortia working in the global development sector rely on the input of local and national non-government organisations in low- and middle-income countries. However, the open access mandates and mechanisms embedded within grants and promoted by funders and publishers are designed almost exclusively with large universities and research institutions in mind. Experiences from the consortium of health research non-government organisations comprising the Communicable Diseases Health Service Delivery research programme show that implementing open access mandates is not as simple or frictionless as it initially appears.

 

NGOs’ experiences of navigating the open… | F1000Research

Abstract:  Grant-led consortia working in the global development sector rely on the input of local and national non-government organisations in low- and middle-income countries. However, the open access mandates and mechanisms embedded within grants and promoted by funders and publishers are designed almost exclusively with large universities and research institutions in mind. Experiences from the consortium of health research non-government organisations comprising the Communicable Diseases Health Service Delivery research programme show that implementing open access mandates is not as simple or frictionless as it initially appears.