University of California and JMIR Publications launch pilot to advance open access to UC research – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The University of California and JMIR Publications today announced a two-year partnership that will make it easier and more affordable for researchers from all 10 UC campuses to publish in one of JMIR’s 30+ open access journals. The pilot, which provides subsidies for faculty who publish with JMIR, is UC’s first such agreement with a native open access publisher.

Under the agreement, the UC Libraries will automatically pay the first $1,000 of the open access publishing fee, or article processing charge (APC), for all UC authors who choose to publish in a JMIR journal. Authors who do not have research funds available can request financial assistance from the libraries for the remainder of the APC so that they can publish completely free of charge….”

After talks with Elsevier stalled, the University of California has been working to advance open access. Here’s how. | UC Berkeley Library News

“UC is in negotiations with Wiley and Springer Nature to renew contracts that expired on Dec. 31. In each case, UC and the publisher have a shared desire to reach a transformative agreement that combines UC’s subscription with open access publishing of UC research. Both publishers have extended UC’s access to their journals, under the terms of their previous contracts, while negotiations are underway….”

JMIR – Preserving the Open Access Benefits Pioneered by the Journal of Medical Internet Research and Discouraging Fraudulent Journals | Wyatt | Journal of Medical Internet Research

Abstract:  The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) was an early pioneer of open access online publishing, and two decades later, some readers and authors may have forgotten the challenges of previous scientific publishing models. This commentary summarizes the many advantages of open access publishing for each of the main stakeholders in scientific publishing and reminds us that, like every innovation, there are disadvantages that we need to guard against, such as the problem of fraudulent journals. This paper then reviews the potential impact of some current initiatives, such as Plan S and JMIRx, concluding with some suggestions to help new open-access publishers ensure that the advantages of open access publishing outweigh the challenges.