Preliminary report on the first draft of the Recommendation on Open Science – UNESCO Digital Library

UNESCO

1. Adopts thé présent Recommendation on Open Science on this day of… November2021;

2. Recommends that Member States apply thé provisions of this Recommendation by taking appropriate steps, including whatever législative or other measures maybe required, in conformity with thé constitutional practice and governing structures of each State, to give effect within their jurisdictions to thé principles of thé Recommendation;

3. Also recommends that Member States bring thé Recommendation to thé attentionof thé authorities and bodies responsible for science, technology and innovation,and consult relevant actors concerned with Open Science;

4. Further recommends that Member States report to it, at such dates and in suchmanner as shall be determined, on thé action taken in pursuance of this Recommendation….”

Preliminary report on the first draft of the Recommendation on Open Science – UNESCO Digital Library

UNESCO

1. Adopts thé présent Recommendation on Open Science on this day of… November2021;

2. Recommends that Member States apply thé provisions of this Recommendation by taking appropriate steps, including whatever législative or other measures maybe required, in conformity with thé constitutional practice and governing structures of each State, to give effect within their jurisdictions to thé principles of thé Recommendation;

3. Also recommends that Member States bring thé Recommendation to thé attentionof thé authorities and bodies responsible for science, technology and innovation,and consult relevant actors concerned with Open Science;

4. Further recommends that Member States report to it, at such dates and in suchmanner as shall be determined, on thé action taken in pursuance of this Recommendation….”

Publishing, P&T, and Equity, an Open Access Week Miniseries, Part 3: How Librarians Became Experts on Publishing and Equity

Happy Open Access Week! This is the final installment in our 3-part mini-series of blog posts on Publishing, P&T, and Equity. The overarching issue: how to reform our research evaluation processes to eliminate bias and promote structural equity. On Monday I argued for ending P&T standards that reward journal ‘prestige.’ On Wednesday I wrote about why institutions who want to build structural equity should reward open publishing practices in their research evaluation processes. Today I will conclude with a little meta-piece on the Library’s place in all this.

Publishing, P&T, and Equity, an Open Access Week Miniseries, Part 3: How Librarians Became Experts on Publishing and Equity

Happy Open Access Week! This is the final installment in our 3-part mini-series of blog posts on Publishing, P&T, and Equity. The overarching issue: how to reform our research evaluation processes to eliminate bias and promote structural equity. On Monday I argued for ending P&T standards that reward journal ‘prestige.’ On Wednesday I wrote about why institutions who want to build structural equity should reward open publishing practices in their research evaluation processes. Today I will conclude with a little meta-piece on the Library’s place in all this.

Knowledge Equity Lab – Centre for Critical Development Studies, University of Toronto Scarborough

“The Knowledge Equity Lab is an inclusive, trans-disciplinary space that seeks to challenge multiple forms of exclusion within the highly unequal structure of knowledge production and exchange. It aims  to be an experimental space which enables the cultivation, exploration and celebration of different ways of knowing. 

Housed at the Centre for Critical Development Studies at UTSC, the lab enables collaboration and partnerships with diverse knowledge makers seeking to advance shared goals of knowledge inclusion, epistemic diversity, and the centering of marginalized and underrepresented knowledge as a means of social justice and change….”

Publishing, P&T, and Equity, an Open Access Week Miniseries, Part 1: Stop Rewarding Journal “Prestige”

“-Part 1 (this post!) will discuss why updating P&T standards to eschew journal level metrics and journal prestige is an important strategy for advancing equity and inclusion, as well as open access.

-Part 2 (Wednesday-ish) will suggest that rewarding open practice and open publishing in P&T standards is an important step toward affirmatively promoting equity and inclusion in the academy (and in the communities we serve).

-Part 3 (Friday-ish) is a kind of postscript that explains a bit about why libraries are especially interested in these issues and how we see the intersection of Open Access, Equity/Inclusion, and Promotion and Tenure with perhaps a unique clarity relative to other parts of the scholarly ecosystem….”

Perspectives on Openness: Honouring Indigenous Ways of Knowing – YouTube

“October 19-26, 2020 is Open Access Week and this year’s theme is Open With Purpose: Taking Action to Build Structural Equity and Inclusion. In an era of open scholarship and research, how do we as a research community navigate and balance openness while respecting Indigenous knowledge and cultural expression? Hosted by the York University Libraries, and moderated by Stacy Allison-Cassin, Associate Librarian, this panel event offers an opportunity to encourage broader participation in conversations and actions around emerging scholarly communication issues and will center Indigenous approaches to open scholarship and research.

Join us with Alan Ojiig Corbiere, Assistant Professor (Department of History), Deborah McGregor, Associate Professor (Osgoode Hall Law School and Faculty of Environmental Studies), and Sean Hillier, Assistant Professor (School of Health Policy & Management) as they lead a discussion on the themes of openness, open scholarship, and Indigenous knowledge….”

ScienceOpen and Compuscript collaborate to promote Open Access—a special post for #OAWeek2020 – ScienceOpen Blog

“Our efforts also coincide with the general theme of the 2020 International Open Access Week: to be open with purpose – taking action to build structural equity and inclusion. In this article, we describe how ScienceOpen and Compuscript are taking steps to make science more open and the research community more inclusive to people from all over the world. We hope that by raising awareness around our efforts, we can reach out to more journals and smaller publishers who may be searching for additional support in scholarly publishing….”

Exploratory analysis of indicators for open knowledge institutions: a case study of Australian universities | hc:32623 | Humanities CORE

Abstract:  While the movement for open access (OA) has gained momentum in recent years, there remain concerns about the broader commitment to openness in knowledge production and dissemination. Increasingly, universities are under pressure to transform themselves to engage with the wider community and to be more inclusive. Open knowledge institutions (OKIs) provide a framework that encourages universities to act with the principles of openness at their centre; not only should universities embrace digital OA, but also lead actions in cultivating diversity, equity, transparency and positive changes in society. Accordingly, this leads onto questions of whether we can evaluate the progress of OKIs and what are potential indicators for OKIs. As an exploratory study, this article reports on the collection and analysis of a list of potential indicators for OKIs. Data for these indicators are gathered for 43 Australian universities. The results show evidence of large disparities in characteristics such as Indigenous employment and gender equity, and a preference for repository-mediated OA across the Australian universities. These OKI indicators provide high-dimensional and complex signals that can be widely categorised into three groups of diversity, communication and coordination.