COAR, TCC Africa and AfricArXiv sign partnership agreement – AfricArXiv

“We are pleased to announce that the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) and TCC Africa in collaboration with AfricArXiv have signed a partnership agreement focused on strengthening capacity and infrastructure for Open Science in Africa. …

The aim of the partnership is to work together to foster the concept of bibliodiversity through information sharing, capacity building, and advocacy work, as well as enable AfricArXiv to engage with international peers in Africa and globally about best practices and next generation repository functionalities….”

Data access restrictions reduce diversity in scientific research, study finds | Haas News | Berkeley Haas

“New technologies have allowed governments and other organizations to collect large, high-quality datasets that can be used in a variety of scientific research, from economics to biology to astronomy. Yet high costs and restrictions can limit both the diversity of researchers who have access and the range of research undertaken with this valuable data….”

The changing role of funders in responsible research assessment: progress, obstacles and the way ahead

“Encouraging interim results of different vaccine trials reflect the speed, innovation and dedication that the research community has shown in its response to Covid-19. But the pandemic has also shone a spotlight on the inner workings of research, and in lots of ways—good and bad—has intensified scrutiny of how research is funded, practiced, disseminated and evaluated, and how research cultures can be made more open, inclusive and impactful.

 

The uncertain possibilities that flow from this moment follow a period in which concern has intensified over several long-standing problems, all linked to research assessment. As attention shifts from describing these problems, towards designing and implementing solutions, efforts are coalescing around the idea of responsible research assessment (RRA). This is an umbrella term for approaches to assessment which incentivise, reflect and reward the plural characteristics of high-quality research, in support of diverse and inclusive research cultures.

This working paper explores what RRA is, and where it comes from, by outlining fifteen initiatives that have influenced the content, shape and direction of current RRA debates. It goes on to describe some of the responses that these have elicited, with a particular focus on the role and contribution of research funders, who have more freedom and agency to experiment and drive change than many of the other actors in research systems.

The paper also presents the findings of a new survey of RRA policies and practices in the participant organisations of the Global Research Council (GRC)—most of which are national public funding agencies—with responses from 55 organisations worldwide….”

Equity in Publishing & Open Science Initiative proposal – Google Docs

“There is a strong need from the scientific community for contributions and insights from often-underrepresented groups including early career faculty and researchers and those from groups underrepresented in medicine (UIM), as well as a widespread need and interest in open science throughout the research and publishing process. Over 500 UCSF faculty are academic journal editors and/or editorial board members and are well-positioned to both share their expertise in existing publishing models and adopt open science models into their own practice. The expertise and strengths among early career and UIM faculty is similarly undervalued and utilized. There is no existing method for UCSF editors to communicate, either with one another or with faculty and researchers interested in mentoring opportunities….

The aims of the Equity in Publishing and Open Science Initiative are:

 

To build a network of UCSF journal editors to enable knowledge sharing and network building between peers.

To facilitate expertise sharing, mentoring, and promotion of scholarly publishing and open science between early-career and UIM faculty and researchers and UCSF editors. 

To identify potential partners with which UCSF Library can collaborate and promote future open science initiatives….”

Webinar | Open Science & the Decolonization of Knowledge: Europe-N.America Tickets, Fri, 20 Nov 2020 at 9:00 AM | Eventbrite

“The Canadian Commission for UNESCO and the UNESCO Chair in Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education are collaborating in supporting an international webinar series in support of the UNESCO consultations on the creation of a Recommendation on Open Science, an international normative document to be adopted by the UNESCO General Conference in November of 2021. The webinar series is based on a brief prepared by Florence Piron (Université Laval), Leslie Chan (University of Toronto), Lorna Williams (University of Victoria, Lil’wat First Nation), Rajesh Tandon (PRIA India) and Budd Hall (University of Victoria). The title of the brief is “Open Science Beyond Open Access: For and With Communities A Step Towards the Decolonization of Knowledge”. Available here: https://zenodo.org/record/3946773#.X2uYDWhKiUk …”

Webinar | Open Science & the Decolonization of Knowledge: Europe-N.America Tickets, Fri, 20 Nov 2020 at 9:00 AM | Eventbrite

“The Canadian Commission for UNESCO and the UNESCO Chair in Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education are collaborating in supporting an international webinar series in support of the UNESCO consultations on the creation of a Recommendation on Open Science, an international normative document to be adopted by the UNESCO General Conference in November of 2021. The webinar series is based on a brief prepared by Florence Piron (Université Laval), Leslie Chan (University of Toronto), Lorna Williams (University of Victoria, Lil’wat First Nation), Rajesh Tandon (PRIA India) and Budd Hall (University of Victoria). The title of the brief is “Open Science Beyond Open Access: For and With Communities A Step Towards the Decolonization of Knowledge”. Available here: https://zenodo.org/record/3946773#.X2uYDWhKiUk …”

Equitable, Affordable Access to Digital Course Materials for University Students: Issues and Solutions – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“To better support student academic success and provide equitable access, libraries are working to overcome these challenges through a variety of means. Efforts include working with instructors to identify alternative course materials through the libraries’ existing collections; working with instructors, publishers, and vendors to identify alternative course materials that have better access and pricing models; and, advocating and developing support for the creation, adoption, and use of openly licensed, high-quality educational resources (OER), which allow for re-use and modification by instructors.[4]

More needs to be done. Online learning necessitates digital access models that foster an accessible, affordable, and inclusive environment for students. Among the measures we endorse are:

Allowing sales of all published e-textbooks and e-books to libraries under a licensing model that allows for access at a cost that fairly reflects content and use.
Making the pricing and availability of e-textbooks and e-books stable and transparent.
Offering license options that enable reasonable, equitable access to educational content without the use of DRM….”

Our approach to systemic racism in Open Education

“The events of this year and the killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd have impacted many of us in deeply personal ways. As a Black woman, I often wonder how to show up as my authentic self and use what power I have to undo systemic racism. At the Hewlett Foundation, I do not feel alone in this work. With a renewed focus on racial equity, the foundation has been taking steps to address systemic racism. This includes looking back at all of our grantmaking strategies to ensure that our investments address root causes of racial injustice. Through this process, we’ve recognized that there is more we can be doing, particularly through our work in open education.

Our Open Education strategy is about the vision that every learner should have access to the knowledge and information that they need to learn. Open education goes beyond a focus on resources and includes practices, policies, and research to create meaningful and inclusive educational experiences for learners. Nearly two decades of work in this space have made it clear that access alone is not a guarantor of racial equity for learners. Instead, learners should be supported and encouraged as sensemakers and creators of their identities and their communities….”

Equity and Access in Higher Education and Academic Libraries Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic

“Although these policies vary in scope and intent, we are troubled by developments on a number of fronts. These include:

? Marginalization of institutions with limited resources, underrepresented communities, and indigenous voices in the post COVID-19 institutional frameworks;

? Promotion of “e-first” collection development strategies that are governed by licensing law that disrupt the flow of information and undermine indigenous publishing cultures around the world, especially in the Global South;

? Over-reliance on large-scale, dominant publishers and distributors of academic content, thereby intensifying the marginalization of small and traditional publishers and of scholarly communities based in other parts of the world;

? Over-reliance on large-scale commercial publishers whose profit-driven business models endanger the collection, preservation, and distribution of robust ephemeral materials such as those generated by emerging political and social justice movements, subaltern groups around the world, and by non-governmental organizations and other advocacy organizations that support them. As a result, these primary source materials will likely disappear, even though they will be indispensable to the research and teaching of these events in all disciplines; and

? Disparities in online teaching and access to learning environments that disproportionately affect communities of color, people with disabilities, and students from rural and low-income areas….”

The Coalition of Librarians for Equity and Access – 2020 Collections Forum

“The global pandemic continues to challenge academic, cultural, and social institutions on many fronts. A network of academic groups, associations, and committees came together to articulate our shared concerns during these extraordinarily difficult times. Our statement, Equity and Access in Higher Education and Academic Libraries Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic, was written by colleagues from 16 organizations and it represents our shared areas of concerns and recommendations on how to alleviate challenges faced by marginalized communities of color, people with disabilities, and students from rural and low-income areas. It was published on August 17, 2020. Well over 283 librarians, students, faculty, academic organizations, executive boards and committees, and professional organizations have endorsed this statement.

We, the Coalition of Librarians for Equity and Access, are delighted to announce that we are hosting the first forum on collections.

The 2020 Collections Forum will be held on November 30, 10:00 am – 4:30 pm (Central Time). It consists of four panels and one moderated discussion. Through these discussions, we are highlighting strategies, projects, initiatives, and scholarly contributions that directly address challenges faced by memory institutions. All librarians and interested groups are welcome! …”