IARLA Supports cOAlition S Rights Retention Strategy – IARLA

“IARLA, representing the research libraries of Australia and New Zealand, Canada, Europe, United Kingdom, and the United States, would like to express support for the new cOAlition S Rights Retention Strategy. Under the strategy, participating funders will “require that a Creative Commons Attribution licence (CC BY) is applied to all Author Accepted Manuscripts (AAMs) or Versions of Record (VoR) reporting original research, supported in whole or in part by their funding.

 The cOAlition S funders want to effect a critical shift in the licensing landscape that would ensure that authors are able to publish in their journal of choice while also making their work openly accessible. The strategy overrides the rights transfer requirements that many publishers require as a condition of publishing in their journals.

Research libraries are committed to universal access to scholarly outputs, and believe that COVID-19 has clearly highlighted the inherent value of immediate openness within the scientific process. This cOAlition S strategy strengthens the repository-based route and signals the continued importance of a robust network of open repositories as a viable means to provide access to global scholarship. …”

IARLA Statement on Access to Digital Content for Education and Research during the Period of COVID-19 Response – Association of Research Libraries

“The International Alliance of Research Library Associations (IARLA), representing the research libraries of Australia, Canada, Europe, the United Kingdom, and the United States, is today amplifying the calls that our associations and others have made toward easing access restrictions on digital content during the COVID-19 crisis.

One of the widespread responses to this crisis in the post-secondary education sector has been a rapid shift from face-to-face to remote instruction. This trend is likely to continue for the rest of the academic term, and possibly much longer. As courses change, students need access to course materials and library resources in digital formats. Likewise, academic research in all fields—and most importantly, on urgent global challenges such as the pandemic itself—must be able to continue through this period of university and lab closures.

Firewalls, restrictive licenses, and unduly cautious or narrow interpretations of copyright stand in the way of remote instruction and research, as they limit access to course materials, library resources, and peer scholarship. Such measures also limit the ability of researchers to share the results of their work.

The current situation calls for flexibility, good will, and collaboration so that post-secondary institutions can fulfill their educational responsibilities and provide remote services using in-copyright works without fear of litigation….”

IARLA Statement on Access to Digital Content for Education and Research during the Period of COVID-19 Response – Association of Research Libraries

“The International Alliance of Research Library Associations (IARLA), representing the research libraries of Australia, Canada, Europe, the United Kingdom, and the United States, is today amplifying the calls that our associations and others have made toward easing access restrictions on digital content during the COVID-19 crisis.

One of the widespread responses to this crisis in the post-secondary education sector has been a rapid shift from face-to-face to remote instruction. This trend is likely to continue for the rest of the academic term, and possibly much longer. As courses change, students need access to course materials and library resources in digital formats. Likewise, academic research in all fields—and most importantly, on urgent global challenges such as the pandemic itself—must be able to continue through this period of university and lab closures.

Firewalls, restrictive licenses, and unduly cautious or narrow interpretations of copyright stand in the way of remote instruction and research, as they limit access to course materials, library resources, and peer scholarship. Such measures also limit the ability of researchers to share the results of their work.

The current situation calls for flexibility, good will, and collaboration so that post-secondary institutions can fulfill their educational responsibilities and provide remote services using in-copyright works without fear of litigation….”