The never-ending story | Research Information

“At the same time, the REF open access mandate had just been announced, stating journal articles and some conference proceedings had to be publicly accessible within three months of acceptance for publication in order to be eligible for submission for the post-2014 research excellence framework. Given the double-whammy of easier depositing and REF urgency, WestminsterResearch saw self-deposits rocket from less than one per cent to more than 99 per cent while practice-based/non text-based entries mushroomed by 246 per cent.

‘The Haplo repository and REF open access mandate came at a similar time and the combined power of both led to this massive increase in self-deposits,’ highlights Watts. 

‘The mandates really helped people to comply to open access,’ she adds. ‘And we believe that factors contributing to more practice-based research included vastly improved templates and fields for these outputs… in the past, the repository just couldn’t take this content.’

Following these results and the looming REF2021, WestminsterResearch switched to a full Haplo open source-set up in 2018, and entries have continued to rise. As Watts put it: ‘I don’t think we’d have been able to support the increase in open access deposits without this rise in self-depositing.’…”

The never-ending story | Research Information

“At the same time, the REF open access mandate had just been announced, stating journal articles and some conference proceedings had to be publicly accessible within three months of acceptance for publication in order to be eligible for submission for the post-2014 research excellence framework. Given the double-whammy of easier depositing and REF urgency, WestminsterResearch saw self-deposits rocket from less than one per cent to more than 99 per cent while practice-based/non text-based entries mushroomed by 246 per cent.

‘The Haplo repository and REF open access mandate came at a similar time and the combined power of both led to this massive increase in self-deposits,’ highlights Watts. 

‘The mandates really helped people to comply to open access,’ she adds. ‘And we believe that factors contributing to more practice-based research included vastly improved templates and fields for these outputs… in the past, the repository just couldn’t take this content.’

Following these results and the looming REF2021, WestminsterResearch switched to a full Haplo open source-set up in 2018, and entries have continued to rise. As Watts put it: ‘I don’t think we’d have been able to support the increase in open access deposits without this rise in self-depositing.’…”

IRUS-UK Newsletter, June 2020

“IRUS-UK collects raw usage data from UK Institutional Repositories (IRs) and processes these data into COUNTERconformant statistics. This provides repositories with comparable, authoritative, standards-based data and opportunities for profiling at a national level. The IRUS-UK service is a community-driven development, responding to user needs….

In response to your feedback, the current Shibboleth authorisation mechanism will be removed so that the IRUS web portal is fully open and supports easier access to data and tools….”

Jisc and LYRASIS help US universities and research organisations gather new usage insights | Jisc

“Jisc and LYRASIS, a global non-profit membership association providing technology and content solutions for libraries, museums, and archives, are joining forces to introduce Institutional Repository Usage Statistics (IRUS) in the United States. 

IRUS-US is the first service to bring together standards-based usage statistics of participating repositories in the US. The service will enable US repositories to provide and gather comparable usage data, while also giving them the opportunity to benchmark usage at an international level. …”

Lockdown report sees record number of downloads through university repositories. But what does that tell us? | Jisc

“The report that convinced prime minister Boris Johnson to lock down our country was the most downloaded academic COVID-19 study in March 2020 among universities and research centres contributing to Institutional Repository Usage Statistics (IRUS).

UK institutions which are responsible for the top ten most downloaded COVID-19 content in March include Imperial College London, London School of Economics, University College London and the Institute of Development Studies. 

But what do the top ten COVID-19 studies tell us about the use of open access materials and the role that institutional repositories (IRs) play in this context? …”