OCLC releases OAI tool for museums

Online Computer Library Center, OCLC releases software suite to help museums exchange data, press release, May 22, 2009. (Thanks to Information Today.)

OCLC Research has released a software suite to help museums exchange object descriptions and share data, the result of a cooperative effort made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to further develop infrastructure for museum data exchange.

OCLC is using the Mellon grant to fund projects involving OCLC Research on behalf of the RLG Partnership and its art museum partners to build an information architecture and model behaviors that museums can use to routinely exchange data.

Museums participating in this effort have a common interest in being able to share information about collection items and digital images from their own institutions, with other art museums, and with content aggregators such as ARTstor or OCLC.

The software was released as part of the OCLC Research Museum Data Exchange Project, which supported museums from the RLG Partnership in defining requirements for tools, and created or contracted the creation of code. …

Museums now have access to COBOAT and OAICatMuseum 1.0 software. COBOAT is a metadata publishing tool developed by Cognitive Applications Inc. (Cogapp) that transfers information between databases (such as collections management systems) and different formats. …

COBOAT software is now available on the OCLC Web site under a fee-free license for the purposes of publishing a CDWA Lite repository of collections information …

OAICatMuseum 1.0 is an Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) data content provider supporting CDWA Lite XML. It allows museums to share the data extracted with COBOAT using OAI-PMH. OAICatMuseum was developed by OCLC Research and is available under an open source license …

CISTI launches gateway to datasets, resources on data management

National Research Council Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information, NRC-CISTI launches gateway to scientific data, press release, May 14, 2009. (Thanks to Fabrizio Tinti.)

Scientific data generated during the research process can be an important resource for researchers, but only if it is accessible and usable. Thanks to a new initiative of the NRC Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (NRC-CISTI) researchers now have a central gateway for easier access to Canadian scientific, technical and medical (STM) data sets and other important data repositories.

The Gateway to Scientific Data will help ensure that the valuable data generated by Canadian researchers is more easily accessible so that it can be re-used for other research endeavours. With the ability to access and use data from a multitude of sources, researchers will be better positioned to turn research into discoveries and innovations. …

Along with links to data sets, the new Gateway provides links to selected policies and best practices guiding data management and curation activities in Canada. It also includes links to selected journals and upcoming conferences and meetings.

The Gateway to Scientific Data is part of NRC-CISTI’s contribution to a broader national initiative undertaken by the Research Data Strategy (RDS) Working Group to address the challenges and issues surrounding the access and preservation of data arising from Canadian research. …

Presentations on OA from Italian event

The presentations from Il peso della ricerca. Valutare una materia umanistica: architettura per esempio (Bologna, May 22, 2009) are now online. (Thanks to Fabrizio Tinti.) See especially:

Science Commons expands outreach on OA data

Tom Sinclair, ‘Open source’ technology is his passion, The Nelson Institute Blog, May 27, 2009.

If the phrase “open source” warms your heart, you’ve got a soul mate in Puneet Kishor.

The Nelson Institute Ph.D. student in environment and resources has been named a Science Commons Fellow by Creative Commons, a nonprofit corporation that promotes free, legal sharing of creative cultural, educational, and scientific materials.

As such, Kishor says he intends to “evangelize” open access to geospatial data, science, and technology. His interest in open access stems from a recent stint as a science and technology policy fellow at the National Academy of Sciences and as an elected charter member of the Open Source GeoSpatial Foundation. …