Food and Energy Security Publishes Issue 2.2

Food and Energy Security CoverFood and Energy Security has now published its latest issue featuring a number of articles focussing on improving global security of energy and food resouces by using agricultural methods. The following articles have been selected by Editor-in-Chief: Martin Parry:

Metallic trace elements in cereal grain – a review: how much metal do we eat?
Tihana Tekli?, Zdenko Lon?ari?, Vlado Kova?evi? and Bal Ram Singh
Summary: This review aimed to give an overview of data regarding metallic trace elements (Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu) content in the grain of globally most important cereals – wheat, rice, and maize. As an important component of human and animal food, cereal grains represent a plant available load of these metals into the food chain.

Avoiding damage and achieving cold tolerance in rice plants
Renata Pereira da Cruz, Raul Antonio Sperotto, Denise Cargnelutti, Janete Mariza Adamski, Tatiana de FreitasTerra and Janette Palma Fett
Summary: Cold temperatures can have negative impacts on rice plants during germination, vegetative growth, and reproductive stages, leading to decreased productivity. Here we review the efforts that have been made to achieve cold tolerance in rice through breeding, the major tools used for evaluating cold tolerance in rice plants, the discovery of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and genes related to this tolerance and the results obtained so far by genetic transformation of rice plants with potential cold-tolerance genes. Possible future approaches are suggested.

 Alternate wetting and drying irrigation for rice in Bangladesh: Is it sustainable and has plant breeding something to offer?
Adam H. Price, Gareth J. Norton, David E. Salt, Oliver Ebenhoeh, Andrew A. Meharg, Caroline Meharg, M. Rafiqul Islam, Ramen N. Sarma, Tapash Dasgupta, Abdelbagi M. Ismail, Kenneth L. McNally, Hao Zhang, Ian C. Dodd and William J. Davies
Summary: The article describes the technique of alternate wetting and drying (AWD) which is being promoted in Bangladesh as a water saving technique for dry season rice production. It highlights the unknown aspects of the adoption of the method which relate to its effectiveness in the long term. Finally it reports an innovative multi-disciplinary project which aims to examine sustainability and offer solutions through genomics, soil biogeochemistry, plant physiology and systems biology.

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President of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) analyses the state of Open Access in NATURE

Open Access to academic publications is on the tear, but the transition period seems to be long and expensive. To overcome this, research funders and research performing organisations have to launch common positions and funding programmes, especially to counteract the market power of some oligopolistic academic publishers. Europe is in an ideal position to take the lead in this process.

see: http://www.nature.com/news/a-coordinated-approach-is-key-for-open-access-1.13610?WT.ec_id=NATURE-20130829

Latest Article Alert from Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials

The following new articles have just been published in Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials

For articles using Author Version-first publication you will see a provisional PDF corresponding to the accepted manuscript. In these instances, the fully formatted Final Version PDF and full text (HTML) versions will follow in due course.

Review
New antibiotics for bad bugs: where are we?

Latest Article Alert from Malaria Journal

The following new articles have just been published in Malaria Journal

For articles using Author Version-first publication you will see a provisional PDF corresponding to the accepted manuscript. In these instances, the fully formatted Final Version PDF and full text (HTML) versions will follow in due course.

Research
Prevalence and distribution of human Plasmodium infection in Pakistan
Khattak

Latest Article Alert from Respiratory Research

The following new articles have just been published in Respiratory Research

For articles using Author Version-first publication you will see a provisional PDF corresponding to the accepted manuscript. In these instances, the fully formatted Final Version PDF and full text (HTML) versions will follow in due course.

Research
Adjunctive steroid in HIV-negative patients with severe Pneumocystis

Latest Article Alert from BMC Women’s Health

The following new articles have just been published in BMC Women’s Health

For articles using Author Version-first publication you will see a provisional PDF corresponding to the accepted manuscript. In these instances, the fully formatted Final Version PDF and full text (HTML) versions will follow in due course.

Research article
Diagnosis, treatment characteristics, and survival of women with

Latest Article Alert from BMC Infectious Diseases

The following new articles have just been published in BMC Infectious Diseases

For articles using Author Version-first publication you will see a provisional PDF corresponding to the accepted manuscript. In these instances, the fully formatted Final Version PDF and full text (HTML) versions will follow in due course.

Case report
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in an HIV-1

The OA Citation Advantage: Comparing Apples and Oranges

The Open Access (OA) citation advantage has been repeatedly demonstrated for Green OA, that is, articles published in any journal at all, but made open access by their authors by self-archiving them free for all online.

But the significant citation advantage for OA articles over non-OA articles — which has been found in every field tested — is based on comparing like with like: journal articles appearing in the same journal and year, and even sometimes matched for topic via title words.

Testing for a citation advantage of OA journals (Gold OA) over non-OA journals (“EC study finds low citation gains for gold open access“) requires comparisons between journals, instead of between articles within the same journal. As a consequence, even if efforts are made to compare journals within the same field, there is no way to ensure that the journals cover the same subject matter, nor, perhaps even more important, to ensure that they are of the same quality. For journals do differ not only in subject matter but in the quality of their content.

As Eric Archambault notes, Gold OA journals are handicapped by the fact that they tend to be younger, and hence have not had a chance to establish a track record for either subject matter or quality.

But even for journals of the same age, and even if they are closely matched for subject matter, it is impossible to match them for quality. And to make it even worse, journal average citation counts (“journal impact factors”) are sometimes taken as a proxy for quality! Hence equating journals for quality that way would guarantee that there could be no citation advantage between matched OA and non-OA journals!

The good news is that there is no reason to believe that the OA citation advantage that has been repeatedly demonstrated by within-journal comparisons using Green OA should not also generalize to OA provided by Gold OA — for articles of comparable quality.

One last point: Our studies have found that the size of the OA advantage is itself correlated with quality (or at least with quality as measured by citation counts): The size of the Green OA advantage is greater in journals with higher average citation counts. We tentatively conclude that the citation advantage is greater for “more citable” articles. A lower quality article will not gain as much as a higher quality article from being made more accessible. OA may even lower the citation counts of low quality articles by levelling the playing field, making all articles accessible, and hence making it possible for authors to access, use and cite the best articles, rather than being limited to the ones their institutions can afford to access via institutional subscriptions.

Gargouri, Y., Hajjem, C., Lariviere, V., Gingras, Y., Brody, T., Carr, L. and Harnad, S. (2010) Self-Selected or Mandated, Open Access Increases Citation Impact for Higher Quality Research. PLOS ONE 5 (10) e13636