Latest Article Alert from Respiratory Research

The following new articles have just been published in Respiratory Research

For articles using Author Version-first publication you will see a provisional PDF corresponding to the accepted manuscript. In these instances, the fully formatted Final Version PDF and full text (HTML) versions will follow in due course.

Research
Characterisation of exacerbation risk and exacerbator phenotypes in the

Latest Article Alert from Breast Cancer Research

The following new articles have just been published in Breast Cancer Research

For articles using Author Version-first publication you will see a provisional PDF corresponding to the accepted manuscript. In these instances, the fully formatted Final Version PDF and full text (HTML) versions will follow in due course.

Research article
Therapeutic targeting of erbB3 with MM-121/SAR256212 enhances

Latest Article Alert from BMC Medicine

The following new articles have just been published in BMC Medicine

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Research article
HIV-associated tuberculosis: relationship between disease severity and

Latest Article Alert from BMC Women’s Health

The following new articles have just been published in BMC Women’s Health

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Research article
Ultrasound mapping of pelvic endometriosis: does the location and

Latest Article Alert from BMC Health Services Research

The following new articles have just been published in BMC Health Services Research

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Research article
Effectiveness of an organized colorectal cancer

Moonlit Rendezvous: The Box Jellyfish’s Monthly Meet-up in Waikiki

Box Jellyfish

When you think about tropical paradise, Hawaii is often at the top of the list. Waikiki is one of the most iconic Hawaiian beaches on Oahu and is a popular swimming and surfing spot. However, it is also a popular stop for the box jellyfish, one of the most venomous animals in the world. Once a month, about 8 to 12 days after the full moon, the shallow waters of Waikiki beach are temporarily flooded with box jellyfish. They are not coming in for a mai tai under the waning moon; rather, scientists believe that jellyfish reproduce in these waters. This monthly influx creates a hazard to swimmers due to the jellyfish’s painful—and even lethal—stings.

The environmental factors that affect these influxes are not well understood, and learning more about them may help us predict and mitigate the risk that box jellyfish pose to swimmers. Several scientists from Hawaiian institutions published the first long-term (14-year) assessment of the environmental conditions that potentially correlate with box jellyfish population changes in the North Pacific Sub-tropical Gyre.

The researchers surveyed a 400-m section of Waikiki beach during the days jellyfish were present. They counted more than 66,000 jellyfish over 14 years and compared the data to 3 measures of how the climate changes over time, called climate indices; 13 physical and biological variables, such as sea surface temperature and plankton; and seven weather measurements, including wind speed, air temperature, and rainfall.

They confirmed that box jellyfish arrive at Waikiki monthly after each full moon and stay for 2- 4 days. They counted on average 400 jellyfish each month, but the range was quite wide at 5-2,365 individuals. Rather than seeing a net population change over 14 years, researchers observed approximately 4-year periods of increased population count followed by 4-year periods of decreased population count, which coincided with fluctuations in three main environmental factors: oceanic changes in salinity and nutrient availability, called the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation, small organisms’ ability to access nutrients, called primary production, and abundance of small zooplankton.

The researchers suggest that the relationship between environmental fluctuations and jellyfish population changes at Waikiki may result from changes in the availability of food for jellyfish in the ocean around Hawaii, brought about by the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation. During an increase in nutrient availability, phytoplankton populations also increase, meaning more food for jellyfish, allowing them to grow faster and increase their rate of reproduction.

Previous studies have shown that jellyfish populations change due to human-caused disturbances, but this is one of the first long-term studies showing that large-scale climate patterns may also impact box jellyfish populations. Understanding long-term climate and oceanic trends and their effects on jellyfish populations may provide information to develop strategies for avoiding mass stinging events and beach closures at Waikiki and other popular recreation sites in the Pacific.

 

Citation: Chiaverano LM, Holland BS, Crow GL, Blair L, Yanagihara AA (2013) Long-Term Fluctuations in Circalunar Beach Aggregations of the Box Jellyfish Alatina moseri in Hawaii, with Links to Environmental Variability. PLoS ONE 8(10): e77039. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077039

Image Credit: Jellyfish by James Brennan Molokai Hawaii

Clinical Case Reports Publishes issue 1.1

CCR coverWe are pleased to announce that Clinical Case Reports has now launched with the publication of its inaugural issue. Clinical Case Reports is a new open access peer reviewed journal publishing case reports and clinical images across all Health Science disciplines.

Editor-in-Chief, Debra Jackson has highlighted two case reports from the issue:

Multiple bone metastases detected 10 years after mastectomy with silicone reconstruction for DCIS and contralateral augmentation by Ryutaro Mori and Yasuko Nagao
Summary: Multiple bone metastases were detected after treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Contralateral invasive breast cancer was considered to be the metastatic origin.

A perioperative uncontrollable bleeding in an elderly patient with acquired hemophilia A: a case report by Andrea Cortegiani, Vincenzo Russotto, Grazia Foresta, Francesca Montalto, Maria Teresa Strano, Santi Maurizio Raineri and Antonino Giarratano
Summary: A perioperative uncontrollable bleeding referable to an acquired hemophilia A, characterized by a high factor VIII inhibitors titer and a very poor response to bypassing agents and immunosuppressive therapy.

In addition to case reports, the journal also publishes clinical images that illustrate a key clinical finding that can be presented in the form of a question. Below is the highlighted image from the first issue:

CCR RashWhat is the diagnosis for this rash? by Namrata Singh and Shireesh Saurabh
Summary: A 46-year-old female with history of Churg-Strauss syndrome was seen for a flare-up.
The rash that she presented with was because of traditional practice called “coining” and this can be confused with physical abuse especially in children and a careful history is needed.

 

Our aim is to directly improve global health outcomes and share clinical knowledge using case reports to convey important best practice messages. The journal publishes common as well as uncommon clinical scenarios with a particular focus on those reports which illustrate the clinical use of important guidelines and systematic reviews.

We would like to invite you to publish your case report with us.

submit your case report

CCR etocs

Tshwane University of Technology launches its institutional repository

The Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) celebrated Open Access Week by launching its Institutional Repository. The name for the repository is Tshwane University of Technology Digital Open Repository (TUTDOR). The launch event kicked off with opening remarks from the TUT Vice Chancellor and Principal Professor Nthabiseng Ogude, followed by the keynote address by the DVC Research and Innovation, Prof Lulama Makhubela. Other speakers included Prof Pierre de Villiers, Managing Director: AOSIS , Mr Felix Ubogu, from WITS, Mr Pierre Malan from SABINET and Mr Lazarus Matizirofa from UJ.

TUTDOR was then launched by the VC who also signed the Open access mandate. The repository was showcased by the Project Leader Mr April Mahlangu and the event ended by the vote of thanks by the DVC Teaching and learning Dr Stanley Mukhola. It was an enormously successful event and Tshwane University of Technology Library and Information Services (TUTLIS) is proud to have been the host of the event and the custodian of the TUT institutional repository leading its university in into the journey to Open Access.

Ecology and Evolution Publishes Issue 3.12

ECE 3 12The latest issue of Ecology and Evolution is now live! Over 20 excellent articles free to read, download and share. The cover image has been taken from the article ‘Daphnia predation on the amphibian chytrid fungus and its impacts on disease risk in tadpoles’ by Catherine L. Searle, Joseph R. Mendelson III, Linda E. Green and Meghan A. Duffy. Below are some highlights from this issue:

purple_lock_open Functional similarity and molecular divergence of a novel reproductive transcriptome in two male-pregnant Syngnathus pipefish species by Clayton M. Small, April D. Harlin-Cognato, and Adam G. Jones
Summary: Evolutionary studies have revealed that reproductive proteins in animals and plants often evolve more rapidly than the genome-wide average. The causes of this pattern, which may include relaxed purifying selection, sexual selection, sexual conflict, pathogen resistance, reinforcement, or gene duplication, remain elusive. Investigative expansions to additional taxa and reproductive tissues have the potential to shed new light on this unresolved problem. Here, we embark on such an expansion, in a comparison of the brood-pouch transcriptome between two male-pregnant species of the pipefish genus Syngnathus.

purple_lock_open Drosophila rely on learning while foraging under semi-natural conditions by Vukašin Zrelec, et al.
Summary: Learning is predicted to affect manifold ecological and evolutionary processes, but the extent to which animals rely on learning in nature remains poorly known, especially for short-lived non-social invertebrates. This is in particular the case for Drosophila, a favourite laboratory system to study molecular mechanisms of learning. Here we tested whether Drosophila melanogaster use learned information to choose food while free-flying in a large greenhouse emulating the natural environment.

purple_lock_open Strong species-environment feedback shapes plant community assembly along environmental gradients by Jiang Jiang and Donald L. DeAngelis
Summary: An aim of community ecology is to understand the patterns of competing species assembly along environmental gradients. All species interact with their environments. However, theories of community assembly have seldom taken into account the effects of species that are able to engineer the environment. In this modeling study, we integrate the species’ engineering trait together with processes of immigration and local dispersal into a theory of community assembly.

Read other top articles in this issue >

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