PBJ is now a leading open access plant journal – Daniell – 2017 – Plant Biotechnology Journal – Wiley Online Library

“Welcome to the first issue of the fifteenth volume of Plant Biotechnology Journal. I would like to start this editorial by announcing the successful transition of PBJ from a subscription-based journal to an open access journal supported exclusively by authors. This resulted in enhanced free global access to all readers. I applaud the PBJ management team for offering free open access to all articles published in this journal in the past 14 years. As the first among the top ten open access plant science journals, based on 2016 citations, PBJ is very likely to be ranked among the top three journals publishing original research. PBJ is now compatible with mobile platforms, tablets, iPads, and iPhones and offers several new options to evaluate short- and long-term impact of published articles, including Altmetric scores, article readership, and citations….”

ERIC – Open Access in China and Its Effect on Academic Libraries, Journal of Academic Librarianship, 2013-Jan

Abstract:  OA is to become the future of academic library exchanges in China. With the government’s support and promotion of OA, more and more Chinese academic libraries have been committed to participating in OA. The rapid development of OA not only has changed the model of traditional scholarly communication and brought a free communication environment of scholarly information, but also continues to impact on all aspects of academic libraries, including their role, collections, technology and services.

The Digital Rights Movement: The Role of Technology in Subverting Digital Copyright : Hector Postigo : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

“The movement against restrictive digital copyright protection arose largely in response to the excesses of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) of 1998. In The Digital Rights Movement, Hector Postigo shows that what began as an assertion of consumer rights to digital content has become something broader: a movement concerned not just with consumers and gadgets but with cultural ownership. Increasingly stringent laws and technological measures are more than incoveniences; they lock up access to our “cultural commons.”

Postigo describes the legislative history of the DMCA and how policy “blind spots” produced a law at odds with existing and emerging consumer practices. Yet the DMCA established a political and legal rationale brought to bear on digital media, the Internet, and other new technologies. Drawing on social movement theory and science and technology studies, Postigo presents case studies of resistance to increased control over digital media, describing a host of tactics that range from hacking to lobbying.

Postigo discusses the movement’s new, user-centered conception of “fair use” that seeks to legitimize noncommercial personal and creative uses such as copying legitimately purchased content and remixing music and video tracks. He introduces the concept of technological resistance—when hackers and users design and deploy technologies that allows access to digital content despite technological protection mechanisms—as the flip side to the technological enforcement represented by digital copy protection and a crucial tactic for the movement.

This is an open access title from MIT Press (2012)….”

Full-text mining of MIT thesis content: Help us experiment | MIT Libraries News

“Curious about text mining? So are we! The MIT Libraries is exploring what a text mining service for our thesis collection could look like. What does that mean? Using a simple interface or by building your own tool using an API, you can search and download the full text of theses and dissertations published at MIT, and then use that content for your own further research and analysis.

So we’re building a prototype API to experiment, and here’s where we need you: We want to know more about how researchers might use such a service and what it should include. Do you do full text data mining as part of your research? Do you use other services like this and have opinions about them? Want to help us test our prototype?…”

Full-text mining of MIT thesis content: Help us experiment | MIT Libraries News

“Curious about text mining? So are we! The MIT Libraries is exploring what a text mining service for our thesis collection could look like. What does that mean? Using a simple interface or by building your own tool using an API, you can search and download the full text of theses and dissertations published at MIT, and then use that content for your own further research and analysis.

So we’re building a prototype API to experiment, and here’s where we need you: We want to know more about how researchers might use such a service and what it should include. Do you do full text data mining as part of your research? Do you use other services like this and have opinions about them? Want to help us test our prototype?…”

Data Access :: SPARC

“The SPARC [Stratosphere-Troposphere Processes and their Role in Climate] Data Centre provides open access to most data sets hosted on the ftp server. Ftp access and a description of each data set, including in some cases key findings and references, is provided through the links below. Open access is provided for the benefit of the SPARC scientific community, to promote new research and applications beyond the scope of the original studies, and to provide transparency and reproducibility of published results. Certain data sets require user agreements while others remain restricted to access by SPARC project scientists pending publication of associated analysis….”

Open data et décision de justice « anonyme », un mariage impossible ?

From Google’s English: “The question of the merits of disseminating the names of parties in court decisions has never been taken seriously by the public authorities. The online dissemination of jurisprudence on various websites, public (Legifrance) and private (sometimes greedy appetites), coupled with the power of new search engines, has in particular made the anonymization of court decisions a matter fundamental.”