A Cooperative Publishing Model for Sustainable Scholarship

Abstract:  Organizing scholarly publishing as a cooperative business has the promise of making journals more affordable and scholarly publishing more sustainable. The authors describe the development of the modern cooperative from its beginnings in England during the Industrial Revolution and highlight the great extent and diversity of business worldwide that is currently done cooperatively. Some of the current initiatives in scholarly publishing (SPARC, PLoS, German Academic Publishing, etc.) are analysed in light of cooperative business principles, and it is shown that, while these models often partially utilize cooperative business practices, none of them has adopted the cooperative model in totality.

Making Indian science more open and accessible – IndiaBioscience

“Sridhar Gutam is a senior scientist at ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru. He is also the convenor of Open access India, an organisation advocating open access, open data and open education in India….”

Amicus brief in support of Public.Resource.Org from a group of library associations and non-profits

“Access to the Text of the Law Advances Practical Interests of Vital National Importance….Access to the Text of the Law Is a Fundamental Right and Important National Interest, Superior to Private Copyrights….The Standards Organizations Need Not Depend on Copyright Royalties, and Can Be Fully Compensated by Other Means….Multiple Doctrines Involved in This Case Can Account for a Fundamental Right of Access to the Text of the Law….”

OSF | Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices

“There is no central authority determining the validity of scientific claims. Accumulation of scientific knowledge proceeds via open communication with the community. Sharing evidence for scientific claims facilitates critique, extension, and application. Despite the importance of open communication for scientific progress, present norms do not provide strong incentives for individual researchers to share data, materials, or their research process. Journals can provide such incentives by acknowledging open practices with badges in publications….”

Open Science Badges

“What are Open Science Badges?

Badges to acknowledge open science practices are incentives for researchers to share data, materials, or to preregister.

Badges signal to the reader that the content has been made available and certify its accessibility in a persistent location….

 

Badges seem silly. Do they work?

Yes. Implementing these badges dramatically increases the rate of data sharing (Kidwell et al, 2016).

A recent systematic review identified this badging program as the only evidence-based incentive program that this effective at increasing the rates of data sharing (Rowhani-Farid et al., 2017).

View a list of journals and organizations that have adopted badges here….”

More disasters predicted as analysis exposes “widening construction knowledge gap”

“An unprecedented study of 6 million pieces of data claims to shows that the knowledge framework underpinning UK construction is not fit for purpose.

As the industry reels from the deadly Grenfell Tower fire, the study’s authors warn that practitioners do not have ready access to critical knowledge and that more mistakes are “inevitable”.

Designing Buildings Wiki, an open knowledge base, says it has undertaken the first comprehensive mapping of construction industry knowledge.

It published what it calls the “startling results” in a report this week, which found that:

Too much essential knowledge is difficult to understand, buried in long documents or locked behind pay walls and will not be used.

Practitioners need accessible, practical, easy-to-use guidance to help them carry out everyday activities.

The industry lacks the strategic leadership needed to coordinate the creation and dissemination of knowledge.

The internet has fundamentally changed the way practitioners access knowledge, but the industry has not kept up….”

Digital Futures Consortium at Harvard University

“The Digital Futures Consortium at Harvard University is a network of technologists, faculty, researchers, and librarians engaged in the ongoing transformation of scholarship through innovative technology. We are dedicated to sharing expertise across the global academic community, facilitating new forms and methods of research, and fostering collaborative projects that bring about field­ changing developments in scholarship….”