Preserving Harvard’s Early Data and Research in Astronomy

“Material originally produced during the mid-to-late 19th century and early 20th century by researchers at the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) was recently re-discovered in the HCO Astronomical Plate Stacks collection. This material helps represent the history of the HCO and acts as an irreplaceable primary source on the evolution of observation methods and astronomy as a science. The material is also relevant to the history of women in science as the collection contains log books and notebooks produced by the Harvard Computers, women who have come back into the spotlight due to the recent release of a book by author Dava Sobel titled “The Glass Universe”.  Wolbach Library anticipates that this material, once preserved and made searchable, will enable research into early astronomy for future generations….”

Therapoid, from Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates and enables collaboration among life science researchers around the world!

 

There are highly qualified scientists everywhere. They want to collaborate. However, there is no comprehensive platform for them to do so – until now!

 

The Open Therapeutics’ Therapoid™ scientific ecosystem enables much more than just collaboration.

 

As a web platform for scientific collaboration Therapoid includes:

 

Open biotechnologies for advancing research and gaining publications,

Funding to further develop open biotechnologies,

An asset exchange that hosts freely available equipment and supplies,

A manuscript development process,

A preprint server for hosting manuscripts.

Goals of Open Therapeutics’ include lowering biotechnology and pharmaceutical costs, reducing the risks and time to develop life-saving therapies, and broadening markets for therapeutics, particularly for underserved populations around the world.”

Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates biopharma developments by enabling capable and responsible researchers around the world to collaborate. Open Therapeutics has two components: (i) an open web platform for scientific collaboration known as Therapoid™, and (ii) open biotechnologies for rapid prototyping of therapeutics.

Open Therapeutics™ enables open access, open collaboration, rapid prototyping, meritocracy, and community. The goal is to lower costs, reduce risks and time, and broaden markets for therapeutics.

The Therapoid™ web portal enables international scientists to share research easily, while it also opens a path to develop dormant technologies. Simple to use tools enable more effective collaboration. The combination of collaboration and biotechnologies will lead to better therapeutics for patients in every country….”

How biologists pioneered preprints—with paper and postage | Science

Abstract:  As a growing number of biologists formally share their papers in online repositories, it’s often said that they are catching up with physicists, who have posted preprints in the online arXiv server since 1991. But biomedical scientists were actually first, reveals a researcher who has traced a “forgotten experiment” from the 1960s, when the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, created a preprint exchange but shut it down when publishers objected. Matthew Cobb, a biologist and science historian at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, recounts how starting in 1961, a 70-year-old NIH administrator named Errett Albritton formed what he called information exchange groups, consisting of interested scientists working in the same subfield.

Innovative workflows around APC management – Strathprints

Abstract:  The presentation describes a number of examples of innovative workflows around the management of Article Processing Charges (APCs) as implemented at the University of Strathclyde Library. It’s argued that a certain creativity may be applied to the area of institutional APC management with the two-fold purpose of (i) extending the funding eligibility beyond the default coverage provided by the RCUK and COAF block grants and (ii) paying lower APC fees whenever possible. The background strategy is to build a relation of trust with as many researchers as possible that will make it easier for them to remain aware of the need to meet the (Green) Open Access policy requirements. It’s also argued that there could be significant benefits to be reaped from the extension into this APC management area of the current cross-institutional collaboration within the Open Access Scotland Group.

onthewards | a free open access medical education website

“onthewards is a free open access medical education website dedicated to creating resources for the doctors of today and tomorrow. Our educational topics are selected by junior doctors for junior doctors.

We release a podcast (onthepods) each week that can be listened to directly from the website, downloaded through our app or streamed via iTunes or your favourite podcast service. Each podcast also includes a summary of the content, written by a junior doctor….”

Impact of Open Access – Open Access – LibGuides at Queen’s University Belfast

“Has Open Access had a positive impact on your publication or research?

The Open Access Team would love to hear if you or your colleagues have experienced a positive impact on your publication or research as a direct result of it being open access….”

The OA team then posts faculty responses to the web page.

Brazilians launch “Libre”, a new microfinancing technology for journalism | Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas

“Brazil has seen dozens of independent journalism initiatives emerge in recent years, many of them launched with the proposal of innovating in terms of content and the ways it’s presented. One challenge facing most of these initiatives concerns financial sustainability: how to generate the income needed to improve journalistic quality, keeping content accessible to as many people as possible?

Libre, a new microfinancing technology for digital journalism, aims to help Brazilian outlets solve this impasse. The tool uses a mechanism similar to likes and shares in social networks, but proposes the transformation of these manifestations of appreciation for content into financial support for outlets and journalists….”