Putting an end to download-and-go: The website’s role in a content marketing ecosystem – Wilcock – 2017 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“If publishers are to thrive in an increasingly hostile landscape of open access mandates, decreasing research and library funding, ResearchGate, Sci-Hub and other pirate sites, and out-of-copyright usage, all while defending against everyday competitive pressures, they must distinguish their content and their brand from their competitors’ and deepen their relationships with readers and subscribers. However, quality content is no longer enough to attract and retain online readers, who can too often find a publisher’s paywall-protected content on another site where it is available for free or request it from colleagues.

For example, a study by the inventors of Unpaywall, a browser extension that locates (legally) free versions of articles, found that ~4.8% of all journal articles with DOIs – ~2.97 million articles – are behind a paywall on their publisher’s site but have also been deposited in open access repositories by their authors; such articles account for over 9% of all searches via Unpaywall (Piowar et al., 2017). As of August 2017, Unpaywall had about 80,000 users (Chawla, 2017)….”

Research Data Management Services in Academic Libraries in the US: A Content Analysis of Libraries’ Websites | Yoon | College & Research Libraries

“Examining landscapes of research data management services in academic libraries is timely and significant for both those libraries on the front line and the libraries that are already ahead. While it provides overall understanding of where the research data management program is at and where it is going, it also provides understanding of current practices and data management recommendations and/or tool adoptions as well as revealing areas of improvement and support. This study examined the research data (management) services in academic libraries in the United States through a content analysis of 185 library websites, with four main areas of focus: service, information, education, and network. The results from the content analysis of these webpages reveals that libraries need to advance and engage more actively to provide services, supply information online, and develop educational services. There is also a wide variation among library data management services and programs according to their web presence.”

Open Knowledge Finland to produce report on the openness of key scientific publishers

“To round off a great Open Access  week, we’d like to announce a new interesting project we’ve started. Continuing our efforts in the field of Open Science, Open Knowledge Finland was commissioned by CSC – IT Center for Science and the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture to implement a Study on the Openness of Scientific Publishers.”

Springer Nature deposits 600k chemical compounds on PubChem | Research Information

“Springer Nature has deposited 600,000 chemical compounds on PubChem, collectively offering more than 26 million links back into the primary literature, eBooks or major reference works located on SpringerLink, BMC or nature.com. Of these, 1.6 million links point to open or free access documents. Documents from all chemistry and life sciences-related disciplines were automatically annotated using InfoChem’s chemical named entity recognition technology. In the PubChem Compound Summary users now will find a widget listing the Springer Nature Documents containing that compound. The relevance of the compounds in these articles was determined using a smart algorithm which allows sorting the documents hit list by compound relevance. Steffen Pauly, editorial director for chemistry at Springer Nature, said: ‘This will allow researchers worldwide to easily find chemical compounds in Springer Nature content, regardless of which synonym is used. It is the first time that a publisher has made automatically generated chemistry content publicly available to such an extent and in such a systematical manner.'”

Public access to historical records now more accessible -as National Archives continues digitisation process

“Historical records are being made more accessible to students and members of the public as the process of digitisation of valuable primary source documents continues. Archivist at the National Archives of Guyana, Department of Culture, Ministry of Social Cohesion, Ms. Nadia Gamel-Carter, today, provided this update at the opening of the Archives Week Exhibition. The week-long exhibition dedicated to the commemoration of the Centenary Anniversary for the Abolition of Indentureship targets secondary and tertiary students and aims to raise awareness about the genealogical research and other services that the agency provides.”

Green Open Access: An Imperfect Standard – Politics, Distilled

“In my last post on the lack of accessibility of Gold Open Access for early career researchers (ECRs), I mentioned that in my opinion Green Open Access was a very imperfect solution – in fact, hardly a solution at all.  I expand here on why that is the case, and why a focus on green OA presents new challenges for publication practices which compound the – already many – challenges of moving towards a greater accessibility of research. Not all OA initiatives are equal.  Green Open Access, by far the commonest kind, refers to the depositing of a non-final version of the published manuscript into a research repository – generally either an institutional repository (managed by the university with which the researcher is affiliated), a subject-specific repository (such as ArXiv/SocArXiv), an academic networking website such as Academia.edu, ResearchGate, or Mendeley, or a personal website.  Various publishers have rules on what version can be posted where and when, with the most common being that accepted manuscripts (after peer-review, but before proofreading and typesetting) can be made public in repositories after an embargo period, while the “version of record” – the published version – may not be shared publicly for free.  The published article remains accessible only with paid access (with publishers either explicitly authorizing (SAGE) or tacitly tolerating the private sharing of full articles.”

G-8 Leaders Communique (June 18, 2013)

“Open government data are an essential resource of the information age. Moving data into the public sphere can improve the lives of citizens, and increasing access to these data can drive innovation, economic growth and the creation of good jobs. Making government data publicly available by default and reusable free of charge in machine-readable, readily-accessible, open formats, and describing these data clearly so that the public can readily understand their contents and meanings, generates new fuel for innovation by private sector innovators, entrepreneurs, and non-governmental organisations. Open data also increase awareness about how countries’ natural resources are used, how extractives revenues are spent, and how land is transacted and managed.

47. We have today agreed and published an Open Data Charter (annexed) with the following principles:

Open Data by Default – foster expectations that government data be published openly while continuing to safeguard privacy;

Quality and Quantity – release quality, timely and well described open data;

Useable by All – release as much data in as many open formats as possible;

Releasing Data for Improved Governance – share expertise and be transparent about data collection, standards and publishing processes;

Releasing Data for Innovation – consult with users and empower future generations of innovators….

We will publish individual action plans detailing how we will implement the Open Data Charter according to our national frameworks (October 2013)…[for example] Genome data, research and educational activity, experiment results….”

Competitiveness Council, 26-27/05/2016 – Consilium

“Following a debate on open science, the [Competitiveness] Council adopted conclusions on the transition towards an open science system….Chairing the Council, Sander Dekker, State Secretary of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands, made the following statement: “Open Science is a topic which is very dear to our hearts. During the Netherlands presidency, we have aimed at bringing Europe to the forefront of global change and at leading the transition to a new way of doing research and science based on openness, big data and cloud computing. Open Science breaks down the barriers around universities and ensures that society benefits as much as possible from all scientific insights. In that way we maximize the input of researchers, universities and knowledge institutions”. Today, building on work done during recent months, particularly at the April conference when we approved the “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science”, I can say that we have made a major step forward”. …”

Successful Open Access Event at University of Nigeria, Nsukka

Wow! It was really great to host the very first Open Access Week at University of Nigeria, Nsukka which was on 24th October, 2017. The event was organised by a group of Open Access Advocates ranging from Librarians, Pharmacists, Scientists and other lecturers who think that scholarship has come to a point where research data and related resources should be globally visible. The event was well attended and the Vice Chancellor, Prof. B. C. Ozumba declared the event open. 

There was a radio talk show by the University Librarian – Prof. Chinwe Ezeani and two other members of the Open Access Group – Dr. Mrs N. Ekere and Dr. Ubaka C. The topics were on Open Access and Institutional Repositories, Open Education and Open Science. 

After the radio programme which was at 9:am, the workshop kicked off at 11am. The event commenced with video clips on Open Access which were played to participants, after which Dr. Ifeanyi Ezema spoke on Open Access Publishing and and the future of Scholarship in Africa. The second presentation was on Open Science and this was done by Dr. Ubaka, a Clinical Pharmacy lecturer. Dr. Mrs Ekere who is a Reference Librarian at University of Nigeria, spoke on Open Education.

There were lots of on-session social media activities. Members tweeted about the event using the following hashtags and mentions: 

#openaccess #openaccessng #INASPInfo #OAWeek #OAWeekUNN #OAWeek17

@openaccessunn @open_access @open_con @libraryunn @openaccessng

See more pictures of the event below: