[1707.04207] Incidental or influential? – Challenges in automatically detecting citation importance using publication full texts

“This work looks in depth at several studies that have attempted to automate the process of citation importance classification based on the publications full text. We analyse a range of features that have been previously used in this task. Our experimental results confirm that the number of in text references are highly predictive of influence. Contrary to the work of Valenzuela et al. we find abstract similarity one of the most predictive features. Overall, we show that many of the features previously described in literature are not particularly predictive. Consequently, we discuss challenges and potential improvements in the classification pipeline, provide a critical review of the performance of individual features and address the importance of constructing a large scale gold standard reference dataset.” 

The Open Access Tracking Project: an Intro with Peter Suber | Eventbrite

“Join ASIS&T for an introduction to the Open Access Tracking Project by Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Open Access Project and the Harvard Office of Scholarly Communication. Suber will be presenting his Open Access Tracking project and looking for students to provide future assistance. Come hangout with other LIS students and learn about an exciting new opportunity. Light refreshments will be provided.”

The Economic Logic of ‘Open Science’ and the Balance between Private Property Rights and the Public Domain in Scientific Data and Information: A Primer | SIEPR

“The progress of scientific and technological knowledge is a cumulative process, one that depends in the long?run on the rapid and widespread disclosure of new findings, so that they may be rapidly discarded if unreliable, or confirmed and brought into fruitful conjunction with other bodies of reliable knowledge. “Open science” institutions provide an alternative to the intellectual property approach to dealing with difficult problems in the allocation of resources for the production and distribution of information. As a mode of generating reliable knowledge, “open science” depends upon a specific non-market reward system to solve a number of resource allocation problems that have their origins in the particular characteristics of information as an economic good. There are features of the collegiate reputational reward system — conventionally associated with open science practice in the academy and public research institutes – that create conflicts been the ostensible norms of ‘cooperation’ and the incentives for non-cooperative, rivalrous behavior on the part of individuals and research units who race to establish “priority.” These sources of inefficiency notwithstanding, open science is properly regarded as uniquely well suited to the goal of maximising the rate of growth of the stock of reliable knowledge.

High access charges imposed by holders of monopoly rights in intellectual property have overall consequences for the conduct of science that are particularly damaging to programs of exploratory research which are recognized to be vital for the long-term progress of knowledge-driven economies….”

Open Acces in Zacatecas Mexico: I Jornada de Ciencia Abierta en la Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas / 1st. Open Science Week at Autonomous University of Zacatecas

La Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas a través de esta jornada se pretende dar a conocer uno de los ejes de la política de ciencia abierta en Mexico, y así se proponen dos actividades esenciales: la primera dirigida a acercar a los alumnos y sociedad al acceso abierto a la información generada a su interior, a través de la divulgación de Caxcan su Repositorio Institucional; y la segunda enfocada a los docentes investigadores, para que alimentan con sus trabajos académicos a dicha plataforma. Es el primer acercamiento de la Universidad a este movimiento y se espera fortalecer y capitalizar a Caxcan, para que las acciones en torno al acceso abierto encuentran eco en la comunidad universitaria. Es nuestro primer paso, por lo que si tienen observaciones, recomendaciones y sugerencias serán bienvenidas.

The Autonomous University of Zacatecas, for all Week, aims to present one of the axes of the open science policy in Mexico, and thus proposes two essential activities: the first aimed at bringing students and society closer to open access to the information generated to its interior, through the disclosure of Caxcan its Institutional Repository; and the second focused on researcher teachers, to save their academic work to the platform. It is the first approach of the University to Open Acces and it is hoped to strengthen and capitalize Caxcan, so that the actions around the open access find echo in the university community. It is our first step, so if you have comments, recommendations and suggestions they are welcome.

Journal: Publish here, and we’ll pay you $500 – Retraction Watch at Retraction Watch

“A new journal is offering something we’ve never seen before: A cash reward to corresponding authors of papers it publishes. Normally, in the case of open-access journals, researchers have to pay article processing charges (APCs). But Minimally Invasive Surgical Oncology, an open-access journal launched at the end of last year, flips the typical narrative — it will pay corresponding authors $500 for every original or review article it accepts. If any author joins the editorial board, the payment — which the journal dubs “royalties” — increases to $600.”

Open In Order To Succeed: PLOS Cross-Journal Initiative Helps Manuscripts Take Flight

All properly executed science deserves to be published as quickly as possible. One common frustration of scientists related to publication speed is the review-rejection cycle that in action resembles a cross between cycling on a hamster wheel and jumping through a hoola-hoop. To offer authors a way out of this cycle of delay, PLOS launched a journal transfer initiative earlier this year that provides authors an alternative to starting from scratch for papers not initially accepted by a subset of PLOS journals.

How It Works

Manuscripts submitted to PLOS Computational Biology, PLOS Genetics, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases or PLOS Pathogens undergo the usual rigorous peer review. The paper’s editors assess the reviews and if they decide the work does not meet the journal’s criteria for perceived novelty or impact but is sound, well-designed and well-executed, they will offer acceptance and publication in the multidisciplinary journal, PLOS ONE. Publication can take place in as little as three weeks after the offer is accepted by the authors.

Papers which merit publication will go through the peer review and revision process only once, saving authors, reviewers and academic editors time, speeding the way to publication for quality research.

Why It Works

The benefit to authors is that instead of rejecting the paper outright, editors now may use the decision letter to offer either immediate publication or publication after minor revisions. Importantly, to move the paper along faster for authors – rather than moving the goal posts – the same academic editor will consider the revision. This also ensures consistency of the feedback to authors and expedites the work for editors. Provided the authors agree to the offer, the manuscript will be published in PLOS ONE with both the original date of submission to PLOS Computational Biology, PLOS Genetics, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases or PLOS Pathogens and the name of that journal’s academic editor listed in the article’s metadata. As for all articles published by PLOS, this metadata appears together with citation, copyright, data availability, funding and competing interest information.

Open In Order To Succeed

PLOS has piloted this initiative over the past six months and we’re pleased to report that with substantial support from journal editorial boards and uptake from authors, we will continue this initiative that relieves authors, reviewers and editors of some of the repetition involved in publishing while bringing quality work to the public, faster. There are now notifications of the program on the relevant journal “Editorial and Peer Review Process” pages. Alongside existing manuscript transfer routes between PLOS journals, this newest initiative offers an effective means for scientists to rapidly communicate ideas, results and discoveries to each other and to the broader public.

Open Access has changed the way readers and researchers around the world discover, use and reuse the scientific literature. Open data provides opportunities for new analysis, new discovery and even previously unrecognized new directions in research. Together with open source software, open source hardware and preprint servers, forward movement along the path toward a more Open Science has the potential to expand the venues, styles, and frequency of sharing work. Let your manuscript take flight! PLOS authors who take this opportunity for rapid publication in PLOS ONE can play an active role in accelerating the discovery and dissemination of their work. With International Open Access Week right around the corner, what better motto to adopt than Open In Order To Succeed—for it is success that we seek for reviewers, editors and most importantly, all authors.

This article was originally posted on The Official PLOS Blog.