Open Access, Open Data und Open Science als wesentliche Pfeiler einer (nachhaltig) erfolgreichen digitalen Transformation der Kulturerbeeinrichtungen und des Kulturbetriebes

From Google’s English: Abstract:  The cultural sector is the same as any other social Areas affected by digital transformation and needs to reorganize itself to keep up with the rapid developments digital technologies and their interconnectedness. The special with regard to the cultural area exists in that the target audience is very heterogeneous, whereas digital offers due to their specific needs only meet fewer users. Do not want cultural heritage facilities lose touch with the general public that they give to the audience cultural policy claim to ensure the data underlying the digital offers and Infrastructures can be designed to be accessible at any time which address one as well as the other audience layer, with In other words, they have to meet heterogeneous needs can. If cultural heritage institutions fail to the exclusionary effects that contradict their social mission in the digital space, that will be Potential for Enabling Cultural Participation in Large Parts remain undeveloped, even if they are in constant competition for ever newer and more attractive digital offers maybe can exist (cutting edge). Prerequisite for the sustainable digital opening of the cultural sector is that this, without having to reinvent oneself, it starts to think digitally and the principles of Open Access, Open Data and Open Science integrated into the cultural business. 

Creators of tools for open data? Steal this – The ODI

“One of the goals of our data innovation programme is to support the creation of a healthier open data ecosystem. Our hypothesis was that the first step towards this healthier ecosystem is to look at the barriers people face when publishing data: technical, cultural and organisational.

Our report, What data publishers need: synthesis of user-research, formed the basis of what we know about the needs and problems of data publishers. Our team listened and talked to dozens of people to learn how we can help open data publishers do their job better, faster and more competitively.

We uncovered a range of open data publishers’ needs, and the issues keeping those needs unmet. For tools, these needs are:

  1. tools that are easier to use, especially for novices
  2. better tools for checking and ensuring quality of the published data
  3. better integration between tools in the publishing workflow.

We then used these insights to help develop resources to address some of those needs:

  1. register of tools for people starting their open data publishing journey,
  2. and a range of new or improved tools for open data publishers (in collaboration with Open Knowledge International and Lintol).

As we do not want to compete with other tool makers, we made sure that every output of this work is openly licensed in the hope that tool makers would sweep in, adopt our good ideas, learn from our mistakes and integrate some of our insights – and some of our open source code – into their offering….”

[GOAL] SCOSS calls on the Open Science community to help identify field of potential applicants for second funding cycle

“A year into an important initiative to help shore up vital, non-commercial services within the Open Science community; the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) is now beginning our search for new potential candidates to help fund. If you are a non-profit essential infrastructure for Open Access or Open Science of international significance and are concerned about your sustainability, this mail is for you….

To be considered, all pre-applications must be submitted at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdsRiVAKvM85RIFvVqxVi0AOCgWpP8B-nvp5QojBfLiGUkp_A/viewform by 31 October….”

SCOSS Funding — Call for Expression of Interest

“A year into an important initiative to help shore up vital, non-commercial services within the Open Science community; the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) is now beginning our search for new potential candidates to help fund. 

In short, this is how the initiative works: SCOSS provides the framework and funding structure, vetting potential candidates based on a defined set of criteria. The most eligible of those that pass the vigorous evaluation are then presented to the global OA/OS community of stakeholders with an appeal for monetary support in a crowdfunding-style approach.

At this point, the board is seeking to identify a field of such potential candidates to vet; among the basic qualifications: the organisation must be well-established but concerned about sustainability; eligible services must have a non-profit status in the country in which they are based and/or be affiliated with or owned by a research or educational institution; the service must be available regionally and globally (i.e. extend beyond national relevance). …”

Open Access Symposium – University of Rhode Island

“Calling all URI Faculty. Come share experiences, feedback, questions, and concerns around publishing open access scholarship and participating in the URI Open Access Policy. Never heard of the OA Policy, never published OA? No problem! All faculty are encouraged to attend. The event will include a panel discussion and an opportunity for informal networking with colleagues….”

UNIFI demands Open Access and gives its full support to FinELib’s negotiation goals

”We can make science more efficient by making research based knowledge available to everybody”

Universities Finland UNIFI considers it to be important that Open Access principles will be implemented quickly and therefore gives its full support to the FinELib consortium’s goals in the negotiations with international science publishers.

White Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation

“To respond to a changing world, policy approaches are introduced to ensure an open, responsive and diverse knowledge system. These include adopting an open science paradigm, supporting a diversity of knowledge fields, a greater focus on inter- and transdisciplinary research and the contribution of the humanities and social sciences to addressing complex societal problems….

Increasing access to public science has the potential to make the entire research system more effective, participative and productive by reducing duplication and the costs of creating, transferring and re-using data….

As part of its commitment to African STI cooperation, South Africa will also work to advance the open science agenda elsewhere on the continent and within regional frameworks. …”

Academic-led OA Journal Publishing

“Scholars and academic institutions are committed to making research more affordable and accessible – they should be the ones controlling journals, not corporate publishers. Academic-led publishing is about learned societies, universities, and groups of scholars taking back control of research by using software and services to publish modern journals on their own….”

New Resource to Help Promote Academic-led Journal Publishing

“Have you heard the term “academic-led journal publishing” and are you wondering what it means? Or are you familiar with the growing movement of learned societies, libraries, and groups of scholars introducing alternatives to the corporate journal publishing model, and wondering how to get involved?

We’ve just launched a new public resource page titled “Welcome to the age of academic-led journal publishing“ to provide an overview of the academic-led publishing movement and resources for scholars and institutions looking to support or launch academic-led titles. The page overviews why academic-led publishing is the solution to lowering rising journal prices and how scholars and institutions are operating modern academic-led journals at a fraction of the cost of the traditional journal publishing model. The page is also full of links to resources you can use to operate or support academic-led journals….

Academic-led publishing is about learned societies, universities, and groups of scholars taking back control of research by using software and services to publish modern journals on their own. Academic-led journals like Glossa, which was launched by former editors of the Elsevier journal Lingua who decided to leave the corporate-run title due to rising access costs, are making waves in the journal publishing world. With affordable and easy-to-use technology the academic community is taking back the reins of research access….”