Introduction to the Open Research Library for International Librarians. | Open Research Community

“2  AMICAL Libraries are part of the KU  Selection Committee • The KU SelectCommittee consists of librarians from all over  the world  who make the selection of books  to be included in  our KU  Select Books  model,  ensuring the most relevant content for  users worldwide is included. • Librarians  in  the  fields  of  Humanities  and  Social  Sciences,  selecting  the  most  relevant content  for  KU  Select  2022  HSS  Books: titles for  KU  Select are  not chosen by us or publishers but by the library community,  through the KU  Selection Committee • Thisyear’s voting process closed on 9  April,  we will announce the result and  the new collections at the beginning of May • It  is free to participate!   …”

TRIPLE Crowdfunding Questionnaire

“The following questionnaire is part of the research conducted for the European project TRIPLE. The questionnaire is aimed at the general public. In the following you will be asked mainly a number of questions about your attitudes about the funding of science and about crowdfunding, the practice of funding a project or venture by raising money from a large number of people who each contribute a relatively small amount, typically via the internet. Known crowdfunding platforms include kickstarter, Indiegogo or gofundme. This research will help the project in taking some decisions for the creation of a crowdfunding platform for supporting research in Social Sciences and Humanities….”

Introduction to the Open Research Library for International Librarians. | Open Research Community

“What is Knowledge  Unlatched • How our main collection  is  created:  KU  Select  HSS  Books  Collection • Open Research Library:  central  hosting platform for  Open  Access  content • ORL -mainuser-level functionalities • ORL–how to index content in your Library  System • Time for questions…”

advance: a SAGE preprints community – Browse

“Advance: a SAGE preprints community allows researchers within the fields of humanities and social sciences to post their work online and free of charge. Advance welcomes a variety of preprint* types, including, but not limited to, original research, literature reviews, commentaries, and case studies. Once accepted, each preprint will be freely available online to the research community and peers and will benefit from our monitored commenting feature. Check out our infographic on the 7 benefits of preprints….”

Journal Open Access and Plan S: Solving Problems or Shifting Burdens? – Kamerlin – – Development and Change – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This academic thought piece provides an overview of the history of, and current trends in, publishing practices in the scientific fields known to the authors (chemical sciences, social sciences and humanities), as well as a discussion of how open access mandates such as Plan S from cOAlition S will affect these practices. It begins by summarizing the evolution of scientific publishing, in particular how it was shaped by the learned societies, and highlights how important quality assurance and scientific management mechanisms are being challenged by the recent introduction of ever more stringent open access mandates. The authors then discuss the various reactions of the researcher community to the introduction of Plan S, and elucidate a number of concerns: that it will push researchers towards a pay?to?publish system which will inevitably create new divisions between those who can afford to get their research published and those who cannot; that it will disrupt collaboration between researchers on the different sides of cOAlition S funding; and that it will have an impact on academic freedom of research and publishing. The authors analyse the dissemination of, and responses to, an open letter distributed and signed in reaction to the introduction of Plan S, before concluding with some thoughts on the potential for evolution of open access in scientific publishing.

 

 

 

Attracting new users or business as usual? A case study of converting academic subscription-based journals to open access | Quantitative Science Studies | MIT Press

Abstract:  This paper studies a selection of 11 Norwegian journals in the humanities and social sciences and their conversion from subscription to open access, a move heavily incentivized by governmental mandates and open access policies. By investigating the journals’ visiting logs in the period 2014–2019, the study finds that a conversion to open access induces higher visiting numbers; all journals in the study had a significant increase, which can be attributed to the conversion. Converting a journal had no spillover in terms of increased visits to previously published articles still behind the paywall in the same journals. Visits from previously subscribing Norwegian higher education institutions did not account for the increase in visits, indicating that the increase must be accounted for by visitors from other sectors. The results could be relevant for policymakers concerning the effects of strict policies targeting economically vulnerable national journals, and could further inform journal owners and editors on the effects of converting to open access.

 

 

Attracting new users or business as usual? A case study of converting academic subscription-based journals to open access | Quantitative Science Studies | MIT Press

Abstract:  This paper studies a selection of 11 Norwegian journals in the humanities and social sciences and their conversion from subscription to open access, a move heavily incentivized by governmental mandates and open access policies. By investigating the journals’ visiting logs in the period 2014–2019, the study finds that a conversion to open access induces higher visiting numbers; all journals in the study had a significant increase, which can be attributed to the conversion. Converting a journal had no spillover in terms of increased visits to previously published articles still behind the paywall in the same journals. Visits from previously subscribing Norwegian higher education institutions did not account for the increase in visits, indicating that the increase must be accounted for by visitors from other sectors. The results could be relevant for policymakers concerning the effects of strict policies targeting economically vulnerable national journals, and could further inform journal owners and editors on the effects of converting to open access.

 

 

Decolonizing Open Access in Development Research Journal Open Access and Plan S: Solving Problems or Shifting Burdens?

This academic thought piece provides an overview of the history of, and current trends in, publishing practices in the scientific fields known to the authors (chemical sciences, social sciences and humanities), as well as a discussion of how open access mandates such as Plan S from cOAlition S will affect these practices. It begins by summarizing the evolution of scientific publishing, in particular how it was shaped by the learned societies, and highlights how important quality assurance and scientific management mechanisms are being challenged by the recent introduction of ever more stringent open access mandates. The authors then discuss the various reactions of the researcher community to the introduction of Plan S, and elucidate a number of concerns: that it will push researchers towards a pay-to-publish system which will inevitably create new divisions between those who can afford to get their research published and those who cannot; that it will disrupt collaboration between researchers on the different sides of cOAlition S funding; and that it will have an impact on academic freedom of research and publishing. The authors analyse the dissemination of, and responses to, an open letter distributed and signed in reaction to the introduction of Plan S, before concluding with some thoughts on the potential for evolution of open access in scientific publishing.

Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc agree transformational deal for UK research

“Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc have signed a three-year transitional agreement combining access and open access (OA) publishing to Taylor & Francis Group’s portfolio of journals.

The agreement is truly transformative and provides participating Jisc members with an OA allowance that covers 100% of the current levels of UK research Taylor & Francis Group has been publishing on a subscription basis.

As the largest humanities and social sciences (HSS) publisher, publishing 9% of all UK research, this agreement is particularly important as a route to OA for HSS researchers who do not regularly benefit from the same levels of funding as their peers in the science, technology and medicine (STM) disciplines.

The partnership recognises the goals of research funders and Jisc to transform access to UK research output so that the impact derived from research can be increased. Researchers will be provided with frictionless open access publishing at no cost to them with a streamlined and optimised workflow. To ensure that the deal continues to reflect researchers’ needs over time, participating members are being invited to sign up for an initial three-year period and have the option to extend for a further two years….”

Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc agree transformational deal for UK research

“Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc have signed a three-year transitional agreement combining access and open access (OA) publishing to Taylor & Francis Group’s portfolio of journals.

The agreement is truly transformative and provides participating Jisc members with an OA allowance that covers 100% of the current levels of UK research Taylor & Francis Group has been publishing on a subscription basis.

As the largest humanities and social sciences (HSS) publisher, publishing 9% of all UK research, this agreement is particularly important as a route to OA for HSS researchers who do not regularly benefit from the same levels of funding as their peers in the science, technology and medicine (STM) disciplines.

The partnership recognises the goals of research funders and Jisc to transform access to UK research output so that the impact derived from research can be increased. Researchers will be provided with frictionless open access publishing at no cost to them with a streamlined and optimised workflow. To ensure that the deal continues to reflect researchers’ needs over time, participating members are being invited to sign up for an initial three-year period and have the option to extend for a further two years….”