Introduction to the Open Research Library for International Librarians. | Open Research Community

“What is Knowledge  Unlatched • How our main collection  is  created:  KU  Select  HSS  Books  Collection • Open Research Library:  central  hosting platform for  Open  Access  content • ORL -mainuser-level functionalities • ORL–how to index content in your Library  System • Time for questions…”

Open Access Librarian job in Strand Campus | Professional and support services jobs at King’s College London

“As Open Access Librarian you will play a vital role in making King’s world-class research publications openly accessible to the benefit of all. Greater openness of both research and educational resources is threaded through Libraries & Collections Library Evolution plan to transform our services, resources, and spaces, to support King’s compelling vision to ‘make the world a better place’ in its Strategy for 2029.  

 

The Open Access Librarian role is an opportunity to work in an exciting and developing area of HE Library provision.  You will be part of a friendly hard-working ‘Open Research’ team whose remit also covers research data management services and subscriptions, working collaboratively and pro-actively with colleagues to provide cohesive and high-quality researcher focused services….”

Access to Supplemental Journal Article Materials: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  The use of supplemental journal article materials is increasing in all disciplines. These materials may be datasets, source code, tables/figures, multimedia, or other materials that previously went unpublished, were attached as appendices, or were included within the body of the work. Current emphasis on critical appraisal and reproducibility demands that researchers have access to the complete life cycle to fully evaluate research. As more libraries become dependent on secondary aggregators and interlibrary loan, we questioned if access to these materials is equitable and sustainable. While NISO RP-15-2013 Recommended Practices for Online Supplemental Journal Article Materials was published in 2013, it is unclear if these recommended practices fully meet the needs of users; if aggregators and publishers are following these standards; and if library processes and procedures are facilitating access to supplemental journal article materials. While studies have surveyed authors, reviewers, and readers, or examined journal supplemental materials practices, no studies have surveyed library staff and librarians about their experience with access to supplemental materials and requesting and receiving supplemental materials through interlibrary loan. This presentation reported on a study surveying library employees from academic, hospital, public and special library settings in the United States about their experiences identifying, finding, and retrieving supplemental journal article materials; and proposes ways that libraries, publishers and aggregators can enable access to the complete published life cycle.

 

CUNY Jobs – University Dean for Libraries and Information Resources (University Dean) in New York, New York, United States

“[CUNY Office of Library Services] manages and coordinates the CUNY-wide library services platform, discovery, and authentication; cataloging and records management; centralized e-resource procurement and licensing; a centralized scholarly communications office and repository platform; Open Educational Resources (OER) funding and implementation….”

The Coalition of Librarians for Equity and Access – 2020 Collections Forum

“The global pandemic continues to challenge academic, cultural, and social institutions on many fronts. A network of academic groups, associations, and committees came together to articulate our shared concerns during these extraordinarily difficult times. Our statement, Equity and Access in Higher Education and Academic Libraries Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic, was written by colleagues from 16 organizations and it represents our shared areas of concerns and recommendations on how to alleviate challenges faced by marginalized communities of color, people with disabilities, and students from rural and low-income areas. It was published on August 17, 2020. Well over 283 librarians, students, faculty, academic organizations, executive boards and committees, and professional organizations have endorsed this statement.

We, the Coalition of Librarians for Equity and Access, are delighted to announce that we are hosting the first forum on collections.

The 2020 Collections Forum will be held on November 30, 10:00 am – 4:30 pm (Central Time). It consists of four panels and one moderated discussion. Through these discussions, we are highlighting strategies, projects, initiatives, and scholarly contributions that directly address challenges faced by memory institutions. All librarians and interested groups are welcome! …”

The Coalition of Librarians for Equity and Access – 2020 Collections Forum

“The global pandemic continues to challenge academic, cultural, and social institutions on many fronts. A network of academic groups, associations, and committees came together to articulate our shared concerns during these extraordinarily difficult times. Our statement, Equity and Access in Higher Education and Academic Libraries Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic, was written by colleagues from 16 organizations and it represents our shared areas of concerns and recommendations on how to alleviate challenges faced by marginalized communities of color, people with disabilities, and students from rural and low-income areas. It was published on August 17, 2020. Well over 283 librarians, students, faculty, academic organizations, executive boards and committees, and professional organizations have endorsed this statement.

We, the Coalition of Librarians for Equity and Access, are delighted to announce that we are hosting the first forum on collections.

The 2020 Collections Forum will be held on November 30, 10:00 am – 4:30 pm (Central Time). It consists of four panels and one moderated discussion. Through these discussions, we are highlighting strategies, projects, initiatives, and scholarly contributions that directly address challenges faced by memory institutions. All librarians and interested groups are welcome! …”

Emerald academic culture survey 2020: Openness & transparency

“Our survey revealed a significant shift towards publishing through open access and sharing links to supporting datasets as the type of change that researchers are considering – from 29% in 2019 to 51% in 2020….

On the topic of open data, it was unsurprising that half of all respondents (and as many as 61% in North America) were concerned over datasets that contain sensitive or personal information that is inappropriate or unethical to share openly.

 

For some, there also appears to be a lack of clarity on how to share data, with 7% of respondents admitting that they did not know how to do this. At the regional level, this increases to 16% of respondents in the Middle East and North Africa who were unfamiliar with data sharing….”

Advancing Open Knowledge Grants | Harvard Library

“Harvard Library’s Advancing Open Knowledge Grants Program seeks to advance open knowledge and foster innovation to further diversity, inclusion, belonging and anti-racism

This new grant program provides project awards of up to $10,000. Projects can take a variety of forms, but should be grounded in Harvard Library’s values. Library staff are encouraged to partner with Harvard faculty, centers, or departments….”

Copyright life hacks for librarians

Abstract:  Librarians are continuously looking for new ways to make the training they offer accessible and engaging to both colleagues and users. One area where this is especially important is copyright – a topic many librarians identify as vital to their role, but they often find it hard to attend training. Cambridge University Libraries has introduced a range of methods to reach out to even the most reluctant copyright learner and improve the overall copyright literacy of its staff. This article showcases these methods in the form of ‘life hacks’ – simple measures which can be implemented with little or no cost and using existing resources.

 

Methods outlined include making the best use of knowledge already present within your organisation, using visual methods to attract a new audience and creating interactive online resources. Also discussed is the importance of making copyright training accessible, both to users with disabilities and those who may have constraints on their time and technological ability. The article concludes with a reflection about the challenges faced whilst creating new resources. The techniques outlined in this case study can be adapted for use by a range of libraries no matter the target audience.