Beyond vaccines, UNESCO wants more global science shared

“While the U.S. president is calling for suspending patents on COVID-19 vaccines, experts at UNESCO are quietly working on a more ambitious plan: a new global system for sharing scientific knowledge that would outlast the current pandemic.

At a meeting that concluded Tuesday, diplomats and legal and technical experts from UNESCO’S member states tried to draw up global guidelines under a project called Open Science….

The Open Science talks aim to come up with a “soft law” by the end of this year that governments could use as a guide for setting science policies and systematically sharing data, software and research across borders, Persic said….

In 2019, then-President Donald Trump pulled out of UNESCO, but U.S. diplomats are taking part in the Open Science talks as observers….”

Consultation with Indigenous Peoples on the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science

“As a part of a series of thematic consultations for building a global consensus on Open Science, UNESCO organized an online meeting on January 15 to take stock of Indigenous peoples‘ perspective on Open Science.  

In view of developing a standard-setting instrument on Open Science, UNESCO is leading an inclusive, transparent and consultative process. In this process, inclusiveness of diverse knowledge systems and knowledge holders is essential, and the first draft of the Recommendation is based on the broad inputs provided by stakeholders from all regions and groups.

Considering the great importance given to the creation of a productive relationship between Open Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems, the consultation with Indigenous Peoples brought together 120 participants from 50 countries, including indigenous scholars and academics, members of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), members of different initiatives such as the Forest Peoples Programme, the Global Indigenous Data Alliance, the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity, and the drafting committee of the CARE principles for Indigenous Data Governance.    …”

SIOP/CARMA Open Science Virtual Summer Series – Consortium for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA)

“The overall focus of the workshop series is to introduce and teach attendees about open science practices that are widely believed to help researchers produce studies that are better planned and understood by all collaborators involved; more transparent and reproducible; and more accessible, useful, and impactful to the research and practice communities interested in the research. The virtual workshops will be hosted via CARMA’s resources (i.e., Zoom), and attendees can choose to attend any or all virtual workshops.

By attending the summer series, you will learn critical principles and how-tos of open science practices that can be introduced into your research pipeline as well as learn about the perspectives of journal editors and associate editors hoping to encourage open science practices and enhance the robustness of our work (e.g., Lillian Eby of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Steven Rogelberg of the Journal of Business and Psychology)….”

Malmö University Press – projekt med mål att starta förlag | Medarbetarwebben

From Google’s English:  “On Monday, Rector Kerstin Tham decided on a project directive for her own publishing house at Malmö University. The project’s goal is to create a clear channel for publishing dissertations, monographs, anthologies and journals.

– There is a lot in place already to build on, says Malmö University’s library manager Sara Kjellberg. The important thing now is that Malmö University becomes a clearer publisher and takes responsibility in the development of scientific communication and what happens around open science….”

Open Science: Are we walking the talk? • Berlin University Alliance

From Google’s English:  “Lecture series: Open science and research quality in theory and practice

Jointly organized course of the science studies department of the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Objective 3 in the summer semester 2021

Open Science: Are we walking the talk? (Lecture in English) Together with the Open Access Office Berlin, Robert-Jan Smits (Eindhoven University of Technology), discussant: Maxi Kindling (Open Access Office Berlin), students

Participation in the event is possible via the following zoom link:  https://hu-berlin.zoom.us/j/62588510247?pwd=c0Z1YklHZ29FNHVWenlacGt1RGE0QT09 …”

Europe struggles to build common science area

” “This is not going to work if you want … free circulation of researchers, students and knowledge between member states,” said Kurt Deketelaere, secretary general of the League of European Research Universities. “It’s an illusion to think that you are going to create a fifth freedom without a legislative framework.”…

It can boast notable successes: E.U. member states now routinely build scientific infrastructure together, with nearly 20 billion euros ($24 billion) spent across 37 projects over the last two decades. Observers also hail big strides in open science and open access to papers….”

Draft text of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science – UNESCO Digital Library

“In accordance with the UNESCO Constitution and the Rules of Procedure concerning recommendations to Member States and international conventions covered by the terms of Article IV, paragraph 4, of the Constitution, the final report together with the draft text of the Recommendation on Open Science was sent to UNESCO Member States in March 2021 (CL/4349). It is submitted to the special committee meeting of technical and legal experts, designated by Member States, to be held on 6-7 and 10-12 May, as per the circular letter (CL/4338) sent in January 2021, followed by the letter ref. SC/PCB/SPP/2376 sent in April 2021.”

Intergovernmental special committee meeting (Category II) related to the draft UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science

“At its 40th session in November 2019, UNESCO’s General Conference decided to elaborate a draft Recommendation on Open Science.

The first draft of the Recommendation on Open Science was sent to UNESCO Member States in September 2020 (CL/4333), requesting their comments and observations by 31 December 2020. The Open Science Advisory Committee and the UNESCO Secretariat have taken these comments into account in the draft text of the Recommendation and the related final report, sent to UNESCO Member States in March 2021 (CL/4349).

The draft text of the Recommendation will be examined by technical and legal experts, designated by Member States, at the intergovernmental special committee meeting related to the draft UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, which will take place online on 6-7 May and 10-12 May 2021 (letter ref. SC/PCB/SPP/2376 sent on 12 April 2021, following CL/4338 sent in January 2021). 

The draft approved at the intergovernmental meeting will be submitted to Member States in August 2021, with a view to its adoption by the General Conference at its 41st session in November 2021….”

Science as a Public Good: Public Use and Funding of Science

Abstract:  Knowledge of how science is consumed in public domains is essential for a deeper understanding of the role of science in human society. While science is heavily supported by public funding, common depictions suggest that scientific research remains an isolated or ‘ivory tower’ activity, with weak connectivity to public use, little relationship between the quality of research and its public use, and little correspondence between the funding of science and its public use. This paper introduces a measurement framework to examine public good features of science, allowing us to study public uses of science, the public funding of science, and how use and funding relate. Specifically, we integrate five large-scale datasets that link scientific publications from all scientific fields to their upstream funding support and downstream public uses across three public domains – government documents, the news media, and marketplace invention. We find that the public uses of science are extremely diverse, with different public domains drawing distinctively across scientific fields. Yet amidst these differences, we find key forms of alignment in the interface between science and society. First, despite concerns that the public does not engage high-quality science, we find universal alignment, in each scientific field and public domain, between what the public consumes and what is highly impactful within science. Second, despite myriad factors underpinning the public funding of science, the resulting allocation across fields presents a striking alignment with the field’s collective public use. Overall, public uses of science present a rich landscape of specialized consumption, yet collectively science and society interface with remarkable, quantifiable alignment between scientific use, public use, and funding.