Wiley supplies full-text open access articles to Publications Router – Research

“Wiley has become the latest publisher to distribute open access full-text articles to UK institutional repositories via Jisc’s Publications Router, making institutions’ research outputs more visible.

Publications Router is an alerting service that automatically sends research articles to institutions’ systems such as their repositories or CRISs.

Wiley, one of the world’s largest publishers of scholarly journals, now actively deposits open access content from both their hybrid and wholly open access titles across a range of disciplines from science and medicine to arts and humanities, law, business, social sciences and many others.

The arrangement with Wiley and Publications Router builds upon the read and publish agreement for UK institutions agreed via Jisc Collections, as a result of which most UK-authored articles published with Wiley are made open access….”

Wiley supplies full-text open access articles to Publications Router – Research

“Wiley has become the latest publisher to distribute open access full-text articles to UK institutional repositories via Jisc’s Publications Router, making institutions’ research outputs more visible.

Publications Router is an alerting service that automatically sends research articles to institutions’ systems such as their repositories or CRISs.

Wiley, one of the world’s largest publishers of scholarly journals, now actively deposits open access content from both their hybrid and wholly open access titles across a range of disciplines from science and medicine to arts and humanities, law, business, social sciences and many others.

The arrangement with Wiley and Publications Router builds upon the read and publish agreement for UK institutions agreed via Jisc Collections, as a result of which most UK-authored articles published with Wiley are made open access….”

My Research Institute (and Scholarly Orphans project)

“The Scholarly Orphans project explores an institution driven approach to discover, capture, and archive scholarly artifacts that researchers deposit in productivity web portals as a means to collaborate and communicate with their peers. The project is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is a collaboration between the Prototyping Team of the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Web Science and Digital Library Research Group at Old Dominion University.

myresearch.institute and scholarlyorphans.org are components in a limited-term experiment conducted as part of the Scholarly Orphans project. The experiment is set up as an automated pipeline that is coordinated by an institutional orchestrator process, as depicted below. It was started on August 1 2018 and will be terminated on March 31 2020.

The modules in the pipeline are as follows:

 

Discovery of new artifacts deposited by a researcher in a portal is achieved by a Tracker that recurrently polls the portal’s API using the identity of the researcher in each portal as an access key. If a new artifact is discovered, its URI is passed on to the capture process.
Capturing an artifact is achieved by using web archiving techniques that pay special attention to generating representative high fidelity captures. A major project finding in this realm is the use of Traces that abstractly describe how a web crawler should capture a certain class of web resources. A Trace is recorded by a curator through interaction with a web resource that is an instance of that class. The result of capturing a new artifact is a WARC file in an institutional archive. The file encompasses all web resources that are an essential part of the artifact, according to the curator who recorded the Trace that was used to guide the capture process.
Archiving is achieved by ingesting WARC files from various institutions into a cross-institutional web archive that supports the Memento “Time Travel for the Web” protocol. As such, the Mementos in this web archive integrate seamlessly with those in other web archives….”

 

Data deposition required for all C19 Rapid Review publishers – OASPA

“The C19 Rapid Review Initiative – a large-scale collaboration of organisations across the scholarly publishing industry – has agreed to mandate data deposition across the original group of journals that set up the collaboration (eLife, F1000 Research, Hindawi, PeerJ, PLOS, Royal Society, FAIRsharing, Outbreak Science Rapid PREreview, GigaScience, Life Science Alliance, Ubiquity Press, UCL, MIT Press, Cambridge University Press, BMC, RoRi and AfricArXiv). New members aim to align in due course. 

The Initiative, which grew from a need to improve efficiency of peer review and publishing of crucial COVID-19 research, began in April 2020 and now involves over 20 publishers, industry experts, and scholarly communication organizations, supporting over 1,800 rapid reviewers across relevant fields. …”

Full article: An Institutional Repository Publishing Model for Imperial College London Grey Literature

Abstract:  In 2019 we became increasingly aware of authors at Imperial College London choosing to publish grey literature through local website PDF or full text hosting. Recognising the need to improve the institutional open access repository as a venue of choice to publish or co-publish grey literature, we developed a publishing model of identifiers (DOIs and ORCIDs) and metrics (indexing, citations and Altmetric coverage). Some of the incentives already existed in the repository but had not previously been explicitly communicated as benefits; whilst others required technical infrastructure development and scholarly communications education for authors. As of September 2020, a 206% increase in deposit of one type of grey literature has been observed on the previous full year, including Imperial’s influential COVID-19 reports.

 

The ‘Impact Opportunity’ for Academic Libraries through Grey Literature

Abstract:  This paper proposes a new role for academic libraries as part of a wider ‘research practice’ activity for research institutions, incorporating support, training and expertise in relation to scholarly communication and research impact. The role libraries hold within research institutions is changing as the world shifts towards a digital and increasingly open future. This requires a rethink of the types of services and skill sets that are appropriate for an academic library to encompass. The increased focus of institutions and funders on the societal impact of research offers an opportunity for academic libraries to further integrate their work into the open research agenda. Libraries can draw on what is now over a decade of experience introducing open access, institutional repositories and research data management service to their academic communities to inform the development of impact services.

An immediate service that libraries can offer is assisting with the identification of, and sometimes deposit into the institutional repository of, works that are sitting outside the peer reviewed literature – grey literature. This material needs to be collected for the purposes of demonstrating outcomes and pathways to impact. This paper describes the need to consider item classifications within digital repositories. If this new service is considered an option into the future, libraries themselves and potentially research offices will need to look not just at workflows but also item classifications within systems to ensure they encompass this broader collection of works.

 

Tailoring Transformative Agreements to Support Open Access through Automatic Deposit – YouTube

“In this presentation, Ellen Finnie, Open Access Publisher Agreements Manager at the California Digital Library (CDL), explores opportunities and strategies for tailoring transformative agreements to support open access through automatic deposit, drawing on her extensive experience not only at the CDL but also in her former role as the Head of Scholarly Communications and Collections Strategy at MIT Libraries.

This presentation was delivered as part of a Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) community call. More information about COAPI is available at: https://sparcopen.org/coapi/ …”

Repository Quick Submit and CV Scraping – Charleston Hub

“A significant challenge in administering an institutional open-access repository is acquiring local scholarly content to distribute and build the repository.  Complicated licensing and author re-use rights can sometimes be viewed as a barrier by authors who are looking to deposit their work.  Paired with the challenges of communicating the benefits of repository deposit and the rights afforded by institutional open-access policies, limited resources, or lack of administrative support, repository managers often struggle to build a broader culture around deposits outside of open-access advocates.  A proactive, mediated, and collaborative publication review program can mitigate or solve some of these issues.  By reviewing an author’s publication list or CV with an eye towards repository deposit, repository managers and scholarly communication librarians can demystify the process and educate depositors on licensing and open-access policies.  Here, we outline such an effort at Harvard University. …”

Repository Quick Submit and CV Scraping – Charleston Hub

“A significant challenge in administering an institutional open-access repository is acquiring local scholarly content to distribute and build the repository.  Complicated licensing and author re-use rights can sometimes be viewed as a barrier by authors who are looking to deposit their work.  Paired with the challenges of communicating the benefits of repository deposit and the rights afforded by institutional open-access policies, limited resources, or lack of administrative support, repository managers often struggle to build a broader culture around deposits outside of open-access advocates.  A proactive, mediated, and collaborative publication review program can mitigate or solve some of these issues.  By reviewing an author’s publication list or CV with an eye towards repository deposit, repository managers and scholarly communication librarians can demystify the process and educate depositors on licensing and open-access policies.  Here, we outline such an effort at Harvard University. …”