Open access

“Open access (OA) is a set of principles and a range of practices through which research outputs are distributed online, free of cost or other access barriers.[1] With open access strictly defined (according to the 2001 definition), or libre open access, barriers to copying or reuse are also reduced or removed by applying an open license for copyright….”

Open Scholarship Knowledge Base

“The Open Scholarship Knowledge Base (OSKB) is a collaborative initiative to curate and share knowledge about the what, why, and how of open scholarship. This includes reviewing, organizing, and improving the discoverability of content to support the education and application of open practices for all aspects of the research lifecycle….”

Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) – Tagging help by OABN – Open Access Books Network Blog

Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) – Tagging help by OABN

Background

The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP), is a crowd-sourced social tagging project that runs on open-source software. It harnesses the power of the community to capture news and comment on open access (OA) in every academic field and region of the world. We want to help expand its coverage of OA books — and you can help!

How

The OATP has two missions:

To create real-time alerts for OA-related developments, and
To organize knowledge of the field, by tag or subtopic, for easy searching and sharing.

The OATP publishes a large primary feed and hundreds of smaller secondary feeds – one of which (‘’oa.books’’) is a valuable resource for the OA book community. (It’s published alongside our blog posts, and provides valuable updates about developments and discussions related to OA books.)

There are two ways you can contribute to this feed.

 

1) Become a tagger yourself

If you are interested in tagging for the OATP, please have a look at this post, which explains the basics. Feel free to contact one of the OABN coordinators (info@oabooksnetwork.org) with any basic setup questions — all the coordinators have signed up, so they should be able to help you with any initial difficulties.

2) Ask the OABN

The OATP is a crowd-sourced project, depending on the ‘many eyeballs’ principle. The more contributors there are, from as many different backgrounds as possible, the better its coverage will be. However, lots of things might prevent you from becoming a tagger: for example, time constraints, a lack of technical expertise, or other restrictions.

The OABN coordinators would therefore be happy to tag online content related to open access books that is suggested by community members (to get a sense of the sorts of things that are currently tagged, see the OATP feed ‘’oa.books’’, which is published alongside our blog posts).

 

Infrastructure Series: Mapping Scholarly Communications | FORCE11

“This project has piloted and modeled new approaches to “mapping” or making more visible the people, organizations, tools, and services that constitute “scholarly communication” today. We took a multi-tiered approach, coming at this rather large ambition from multiple directions simultaneously. We conducted a census of scholarly communication providers that allowed us to dive deeply into the organizational models, fiscal structures, governance environments, and community engagement of more than 40 service providers, and we published a report summarizing our findings and recommendations as well as a blog post with more informal perspectives. We also created and published a massive bibliographic scan including information about 206 tools, services, and systems that are instrumental to the publishing and distribution of the scholarly record. We also conducted focus groups with library leaders and a survey of libraries to better understand what investments they made in scholarly communication infrastructure and services. …”

Peter Suber on Open Access News | Archivalia

“OATP isn’t my main job by a long shot. But my main job requires me to stay on top of what’s happening in the world of OA, which is fortuitous for OATP. My approach is to read all that I can, for my job, and then share what I read or learn by tagging it for OATP….

Some taggers systematically search for new developments in areas that matter to them, such as OA in their country, OA in their field, or OA on a certain subtopic such as OA policies, OA journals, OA repositories, OA books, open data, OER, or copyright. Others simply tag what they encounter, without taking special pains to encounter more than they already do. I welcome both kinds. As they join the project, in enough fields and countries, bringing their different interests and perspectives with them, OATP becomes more and more inclusive….”

What is the Open Access Tracking Project (OATP)? – Open Access Books Network Blog

A post from the Open Access Books Network about the Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) and how it can be used by anyone interested in Open Access books. Includes details of a Q&A with Peter Suber and Milica Ševkuši? on Tuesday 20th October at 10am EDT / 3pm BST.

Open Scholarship Knowledge Base | OER Commons

“What are we doing? And why?

The Problem

It is difficult for people new to open scholarship ideas and practices to find and apply existing materials.

It is difficult for educators to bring open scholarship concepts and exercises into their courses.

The open scholarship landscape changes quickly, so materials can become outdated. 

Our Solution

Our Project Roadmap outlines our approach: Build a knowledge base platform and a community of contributors to organize information on the what, why, and how of open scholarship so it is easy to find and apply. Contributors keep the information up-to-date and curate modules for self-learning or teaching….”

Open Scholarship Knowledge Base | OER Commons

“What are we doing? And why?

The Problem

It is difficult for people new to open scholarship ideas and practices to find and apply existing materials.

It is difficult for educators to bring open scholarship concepts and exercises into their courses.

The open scholarship landscape changes quickly, so materials can become outdated. 

Our Solution

Our Project Roadmap outlines our approach: Build a knowledge base platform and a community of contributors to organize information on the what, why, and how of open scholarship so it is easy to find and apply. Contributors keep the information up-to-date and curate modules for self-learning or teaching….”

Coronavirus and Open Science: Our reads and Open use cases – SPARC Europe

“As many of us find ourselves working from home we would like to suggest some pertinent reading connecting work on Open Science with COVID-19. Scores of blog posts and articles which demonstrate the value of Open at this time are being written.

I would in particular like to thank Peter Suber and his Open Access Tracking Project (OATP): a service we have been feeding and using for some time now. It is a vital source of news from across the world on Open research and education. If you want to follow more on COVID-19 and Open on this site, you can do so here.  OATP is crowd-sourced and updated in real time.
We have used this invaluable resource combined with our own research to create this curated collection of blogs, articles, news on calls to action and key open resources that showcase how open science supports COVID-19. We will add to it in the coming weeks.

How to use this resource

For those wanting to read about how Open Science leaders and thinkers consider how Open Science is serving to help solve the COVID-19 pandemic and what more needs to be done, the Open Access to research section is for you.
To see how the funders, governments, libraries and research communities are advocating for more access to information to support research through formal calls to action, we have gathered key initiatives calling for change in the Calls to Action section.
If you want to know what publishers are doing to unlock access to some of their materials see the dedicated section.
Last but not least, see the range of resources, e.g. datasets and tools created using Open Science organised by type of output for OS practitioners and researchers working on COVID-19.
Note that this collections was made in late March early April; it does not include all developments since then….”