bjoern.brembs.blog » Minimizing the collective action problem

“Thus, researchers need to modernize the way they do their scholarship, institutions need to modernize their infrastructure such that researchers are enabled to modernize their scholarship. These have now had more than 30 years for this modernization and neither of them have acted. At this point it is fair to assume, barring some major catastrophe forcing their hands, that such modernization is not going to magically appear within the next three decades, either. Funders, therefore, are in a position to incentivize this long overdue modernization which institutions and hence researchers have been too complacent or too reticent to tackle.

If, as I would tend to agree, we are faced with a collective action problem and the size of the collective is the major determinant for effective problem solving, then it is a short step to realize that funders are in a uniquely suited position to start solving this collective action problem. Conversely, then, it is only legitimate to question the motives of those who seek to make the collective action problem unnecessary difficult by advocating to target individual researchers or institutions. What could possibly be the benefit of making the collective action problem numerically more difficult to solve?”

 

Guest Post – Scaffolding a Shift to a Values-driven Open Books Ecosystem – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Pressure from all sides of the ecosystem has propelled growth, experimentation, and commitment to making more scholarship accessible to more people. There is increased awareness, too, that making research open does not resolve all issues of equity and access to knowledge, that more critical engagement with the moral economy of open access is still to come. Living in a pandemic has accelerated the momentum and heightened the sense of urgency, not only in discourse, but in concrete steps being taken and strategies developed by institutions and publishers alike. Libraries, scholars, students, and readers of all kinds have had to move rapidly to adopt and adapt digital resources and tools. Open access books offer increased access to knowledge for the reader, but they also present an opportunity to remake a fragmented ecosystem, and to increase channels of communication about the processes involved in researching, writing, shepherding, financing, publishing, acquiring, and reading research….

Digital books, open or not, require infrastructure. Disintermediating hosting, distribution, and sales helps simplify cost structures. Non-profit presses are developing their own infrastructure to support greater strategic choice. Fulcrum, from Michigan Publishing, and Manifold, from the University of Minnesota Press, are two such developments that expand the new universe of values-aligned platforms. The MIT Press Direct platform launched in 2019 in an effort to disintermediate the relationship between the press and libraries. The platform aligns ebook distribution with the university press mission and opens space for dialogue with libraries. The greater connection with libraries has confirmed a gap in knowledge sharing between librarians, editors, library sales, and authors that, when filled, could make the monograph publication process clearer. Each stakeholder, internal and external to a press, holds valuable information about open access book development, funding, hosting, and discovery. Creating channels to share this information, and doing so through new, collective models, has the potential to benefit the system as a whole….”

Europe struggles to build common science area

” “This is not going to work if you want … free circulation of researchers, students and knowledge between member states,” said Kurt Deketelaere, secretary general of the League of European Research Universities. “It’s an illusion to think that you are going to create a fifth freedom without a legislative framework.”…

It can boast notable successes: E.U. member states now routinely build scientific infrastructure together, with nearly 20 billion euros ($24 billion) spent across 37 projects over the last two decades. Observers also hail big strides in open science and open access to papers….”

Scholarly Publishing Collective: For Librarians and Vendors

“In 2021, Duke University Press (Duke UP) announced a partnership with several nonprofit scholarly journal publishers and societies to provide journal services including subscription management, fulfillment, hosting, and institutional marketing and sales in a collaboration called the Scholarly Publishing Collective.

Electronic content for publications hosted under this program will migrate to the Scholarly Publishing Collective’s platform, managed by Duke UP and powered by Silverchair. Silverchair also hosts Duke UP’s books and journals in the humanities and social sciences at read.dukeupress.edu. The platform will launch in 2022 and Duke University Press will begin accepting renewal orders for the 2022 subscription year in July 2021….”

Duke University Press – Duke University Press now offering journal publishing services to nonprofit scholarly publishers

“Duke University Press is pleased to partner with nonprofit scholarly journal publishers and societies to provide journal services including subscription management, fulfillment, hosting, and institutional marketing and sales in a collaboration called the Scholarly Publishing Collective (SPC).

Beginning in 2021, the SPC will provide subscription management and fulfillment services, in partnership with Longleaf Services, to Cornell University Press, Texas Tech University Press, and the University of North Carolina Press. The SPC online content platform will launch in 2022, hosting journals and fulfilling digital access on behalf of Michigan State University Press, Penn State University Press, the Society of Biblical Literature, and the University of Illinois Press….”

arXiv’s Giving Week is May 2 – 8, 2021

“arXiv is free to read and submit research, so why are we asking for donations?

arXiv is not free to operate, and, as a nonprofit, we depend on the generosity of foundations, members, donors, volunteers, and individuals like you to survive and thrive. If arXiv matters to you and you have the means to contribute, we humbly ask you to join arXiv’s global community of supporters with a donation during arXiv’s Giving Week, May 2 – 8, 2021.

Less than one percent of the five million visitors to arXiv this month will donate. If everyone contributed just $1 each, we would be able to meet our annual operating budget and save for future financial stability.

Would you like to know more about our operations and how arXiv’s funds are spent? Check out our annual report for more information….”

2i2c: Interactive computing infrastructure for your community

“We make interactive computing more accessible and powerful for research and education. We strive to accelerate research and discovery, and to empower education to be more accessible, intuitive, and enjoyable. We do this through these primary actions: …”

The Customer Right to Replicate | 2i2c

“To ensure the Right to Replicate to our customers, 2i2c makes the following commitments to infrastructure we build and operate:

We MUST use only open source software to run our infrastructure. By only using software that is available to everyone on the same terms, we can ensure that customers can replicate the infrastructure without having to negotiate licensing terms with proprietary software vendors. In addition, any changes we make to open source software will be made in public and/or contributed upstream, so customers continue to have access to them regardless of where their infrastructure is.

We MUST NOT directly depend on proprietary cloud vendor specific products or APIs. Instead, we use cloud-managed open source software, or hide the dependency behind a layer of abstraction. This ensures that customers can port their infrastructure to any cloud provider of their choice, or run it on their own hardware with purely open source software.

This set of commitments acts as a business continuity plan for our customers, ensuring 2i2c will follow best practices within the open source, open education and open research ecosystems….”

Future of Open Scholarship

“The leading structures that conduct, publish and disseminate scholarly research are at risk of collapse. There’s an urgent need to invest now in a coordinated approach to create a preparedness plan for the future of scholarship and research at the institutional level. In doing so, institutions have an opportunity to explore collectively cost-effective and sustainable solutions to address immediate needs at their institution. They also have an opportunity to play an active role in furthering a larger, more systemic shift towards open, community-owned and operated infrastructure at the institutional level to support scholarship and ensure research continuity.

To support that shift, IOI launched a research project in partnership with a network of institutional decision makers to model the future of open scholarship….”