Principles of open, transparent and reproducible science in author guidelines of sleep research and chronobiology journals

Abstract:  Background: “Open science” is an umbrella term describing various aspects of transparent and open science practices. The adoption of practices at different levels of the scientific process (e.g., individual researchers, laboratories, institutions) has been rapidly changing the scientific research landscape in the past years, but their uptake differs from discipline to discipline. Here, we asked to what extent journals in the field of sleep research and chronobiology encourage or even require following transparent and open science principles in their author guidelines.

Methods: We scored the author guidelines of a comprehensive set of 27 sleep and chronobiology journals, including the major outlets in the field, using the standardised Transparency and Openness (TOP) Factor. The TOP Factor is a quantitative summary of the extent to which journals encourage or require following various aspects of open science, including data citation, data transparency, analysis code transparency, materials transparency, design and analysis guidelines, study pre-registration, analysis plan pre-registration, replication, registered reports, and the use of open science badges.

Results: Across the 27 journals, we find low values on the TOP Factor (median [25 th, 75 th percentile] 3 [1, 3], min. 0, max. 9, out of a total possible score of 29) in sleep research and chronobiology journals.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest an opportunity for sleep research and chronobiology journals to further support recent developments in transparent and open science by implementing transparency and openness principles in their author guidelines.

Opening the record of science: making scholarly publishing work for science in the digital era: ISC Report February 2021

“As a basis for analysing the extent to which contemporary scientific and scholarly publishing serves the above purposes, a number of fundamental principles are advocated in the belief that they are likely to be durable in the long term. They follow, in abbreviated form: I. There should be universal open access to the record of science, both for authors and readers. II. Scientific publications should carry open licences that allow reuse and text and data mining. III. Rigorous and ongoing peer review is essential to the integrity of the record of science. IV. The data/observations underlying a published truth claim should be concurrently published. V. The record of science should be maintained to ensure open access by future generations. VI. Publication traditions of different disciplines should be respected. VII. Systems should adapt to new opportunities rather than embedding inflexible infrastructures. These principles have received strong support from the international scientific community as represented by the membership of the International Science Council (ISC)….”

Opening the record of science: making scholarly publishing work for science in the digital era: ISC Report February 2021

“As a basis for analysing the extent to which contemporary scientific and scholarly publishing serves the above purposes, a number of fundamental principles are advocated in the belief that they are likely to be durable in the long term. They follow, in abbreviated form: I. There should be universal open access to the record of science, both for authors and readers. II. Scientific publications should carry open licences that allow reuse and text and data mining. III. Rigorous and ongoing peer review is essential to the integrity of the record of science. IV. The data/observations underlying a published truth claim should be concurrently published. V. The record of science should be maintained to ensure open access by future generations. VI. Publication traditions of different disciplines should be respected. VII. Systems should adapt to new opportunities rather than embedding inflexible infrastructures. These principles have received strong support from the international scientific community as represented by the membership of the International Science Council (ISC)….”

Opening the record of science: making scholarly publishing work for science in the digital era – International Science Council

“Efficient access to the record of science – for authors and for readers – is essential for science and society. This ISC Report examines the current landscape of scholarly publishing, explores future trends and proposes seven principles for scientific and scholarly publishing….”

Opening the record of science: making scholarly publishing work for science in the digital era – International Science Council

“Efficient access to the record of science – for authors and for readers – is essential for science and society. This ISC Report examines the current landscape of scholarly publishing, explores future trends and proposes seven principles for scientific and scholarly publishing….”

The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance: overview and Australian activities – Hanging Together

“The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance focus on appropriate use and reuse of Indigenous data. The principles recenter and reframe discussion and action on the sovereign rights and dignity of Indigenous Peoples, especially against the backdrop of “big data” and broad open access initiatives that are prevalent in today’s libraries and archives….

On February 2, 2021 representatives of the Global Indigenous Data Alliance (GIDA) and the Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation Coordinating Hub (ENRICH) and representatives from National Library of Australia and University of Sydney joined attendees from Australian and New Zealand institutions for a discussion session hosted by National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA) and the OCLC Research Library Partnership. The panelists shared updates and examples of their work, as well as lessons they’ve learned. Many thanks to those who offered wisdom and expertise. This is a summary of what was shared in the session….”

The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance: overview and Australian activities – Hanging Together

“The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance focus on appropriate use and reuse of Indigenous data. The principles recenter and reframe discussion and action on the sovereign rights and dignity of Indigenous Peoples, especially against the backdrop of “big data” and broad open access initiatives that are prevalent in today’s libraries and archives….

On February 2, 2021 representatives of the Global Indigenous Data Alliance (GIDA) and the Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation Coordinating Hub (ENRICH) and representatives from National Library of Australia and University of Sydney joined attendees from Australian and New Zealand institutions for a discussion session hosted by National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA) and the OCLC Research Library Partnership. The panelists shared updates and examples of their work, as well as lessons they’ve learned. Many thanks to those who offered wisdom and expertise. This is a summary of what was shared in the session….”

Open research – UKRI

“On this page you will find resources predominantly referring to open access and open research data. However, we recognise that open research covers a much broader range of activities than this and new resources will be added as they become available.

This was an active policy area before UKRI was formed, so much of the guidance refers to RCUK and HEFCE policies. UKRI is currently in the final stages of reviewing its open access policy and will then be undertaking a review of open research data and software policy and practice. These activities will support the formation of new UKRI materials….”

Principles for Offset Agreements [undated]

“As open-access (OA) publishing funded by article-processing charges (APCs) becomes more widely accepted, UK academic institutions face an increase in the ‘total cost of publication’, comprising subscription costs plus APCs and additional administration costs. Most APC payments are made to large ‘traditional’ commercial publishers who also received considerable subscription income. Jisc Collections is asking publishers to introduce offset systems that will reduce this extra cost to UK higher education. These principles are drafted for publishers of hybrid journals (these are subscription journals in which some of the articles are open access). They aim to provide these publishers with an understanding of the requirements of their customers from the UK academic sector. They follow the spirit of the Finch Report, which was informed through dialogue with scholarly publishers, universities, and research funders. It is expected that publishers will adhere to these principles in their design of offset systems. Following the recommendations of the Finch Report, UK Higher Education institutions are in the vanguard of a transition to open access. Although many of these institutions have received some funding to support the transition, collaboration with publishers is required in the form of offset systems to ensure affordability and sustainability. These principles are also designed to provide a checklist for higher education institutions (and Jisc Collections when negotiating on their behalf) when evaluating proposals from publishers for offset systems….”