Apply to join the ASAPbio Board of Directors – ASAPbio

“ASAPbio is seeking two new members for our Board of Directors. With these openings, we aim to 1) improve the racial and ethnic diversity of our board, and 2) include the voice of research trainees, such as graduate students and postdocs. We are also interested in increasing representation from outside the US and beyond cell and molecular biology to include other life science fields.

Both early career researchers and members of minoritized groups hold important, unique perspectives on scholarly communication. For example, transparent and open peer review, concerns about scooping, and publishing biases may be experienced differently by these individuals. We’re seeking vocal people to round out deficits in our current board and help us make productive and equitable decisions about the work we do to make scientific publishing more rapid, open, and transparent. …”

Preprints in the Public Eye – ASAPbio

“While misinformation and misinterpretation of research have been around for a long time, it is no understatement that this ‘Age of Misinformation’ has reached its height in 2020. It has never been so easy to misinterpret or be misinformed about what is going on in the world.

There has been plenty of anxiety about the potential for inadvertent and intentional misreporting of new research related to Covid-19 in the media and how that might be misused or cause harm. The anxiety has been particularly around the role that the explosion of research posted on preprints might be playing in this phenomenon. That said, the impact of Covid-19 on preprints has also provided a strong impetus to develop novel ways to address the problem. 

ASAPbio will be hosting an online event on January 14th that brings together a wide range of expertise to highlight issues around the media reporting of research with a special focus on preprints. There will be presentations of positive and practical steps that can be taken to improve how research is reported in the media to avoid its misinterpretation and misuse. Not least of these initiatives is ASAPbio’s own Preprints in the Public Eye project funded by Open Society Foundations. You can provide feedback on that project here….”

Preprints in the public eye – ASAPbio

“Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, preprints are being shared, reported on, and used to shape government policy, all at unprecedented rates and journalists are now regularly citing preprints in their pandemic coverage. As well as putting preprints squarely in the public eye as never before, presenting a unique opportunity to educate researchers and the public about their value, the rise in reporting of research posted as preprints has also brought into focus the question of how research is scrutinised and validated. Traditional journal peer review has its shortcomings and the number of ways research can be evaluated is expanding.  This can be a problem for journalists and non-specialist readers who sometimes don’t fully understand the difference between preprints peer-reviewed articles and different forms of peer review. Media coverage can result in the sharing of information which may later not stand up to scientific scrutiny, leading to misunderstanding, misinformation and the risk of damaging the public perception of preprints and the scientific process.

ASAPbio, with support from the Open Society Foundations, aims to consolidate and expand on existing efforts to set best practice standards for reporting research posted as preprints via the launch of our Preprints in the Public Eye project.  Read more in the project announcement.  To get involved, email Project Coordinator Jigisha Patel at jigisha.patel@asapbio.org….”

Preprints in the public eye – ASAPbio

“Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, preprints are being shared, reported on, and used to shape government policy, all at unprecedented rates and journalists are now regularly citing preprints in their pandemic coverage. As well as putting preprints squarely in the public eye as never before, presenting a unique opportunity to educate researchers and the public about their value, the rise in reporting of research posted as preprints has also brought into focus the question of how research is scrutinised and validated. Traditional journal peer review has its shortcomings and the number of ways research can be evaluated is expanding.  This can be a problem for journalists and non-specialist readers who sometimes don’t fully understand the difference between preprints peer-reviewed articles and different forms of peer review. Media coverage can result in the sharing of information which may later not stand up to scientific scrutiny, leading to misunderstanding, misinformation and the risk of damaging the public perception of preprints and the scientific process.

ASAPbio, with support from the Open Society Foundations, aims to consolidate and expand on existing efforts to set best practice standards for reporting research posted as preprints via the launch of our Preprints in the Public Eye project.  Read more in the project announcement.  To get involved, email Project Coordinator Jigisha Patel at jigisha.patel@asapbio.org….”

Preprints in the Public Eye – ASAPbio

“Today, we’re pleased to announce the launch of a project on the use of preprints in the media with support from the Open Society Foundations. 

Premature media coverage was the top concern about preprints in our recent #biopreprints2020 survey, for both those who had published their research as preprints and for those who had not….

ASAPbio, with support from the Open Society Foundations, now aims to consolidate and expand on existing efforts to set best practice standards for preprints via the launch of our Preprints in the Public Eye project. We are calling for involvement from researchers, journalists, institutions, librarians, funding agencies, and more to work on the following three main aims or the project:

To improve the transparency and clarity of how preprints are labelled so that readers understand what checks have and have not been made on a preprint.
To agree a set of best practice guidelines for researchers and institutions on how to work with journalists on research reported as preprints.
To agree a set of best practice guidelines for journalists on how to assess and report on research posted as preprints….”

Join the #PreprintReviewChallenge – ASAPbio

“On September 22 ASAPbio is hosting the #PreprintReviewChallenge as part of Peer Review Week 2020. In a live session hosted online, we will get together to write constructive comments and reviews on preprints, with the aim to develop the largest collection to date of public commentary on preprinted research in a single day. PREReview, preLights, Peer Community In and Pubpeer will be joining us to interact with those interested in posting to those platforms; we will also have Maurine Neiman, editor at Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B and Thomas Lemberger from EMBO, who will provide tips and advice on the review of papers.

The session will include:

Session overview 
Editorial tips on how to write constructive reviews
Review preprints! – Work on preprint reviews and comments, interaction with preprint review platform reps
Group discussion to review tally of comments and reviews, and share feedback….”

Register for ASAPbio’s #PreprintReviewChallenge – September 22

“As part of Peer Review Week 2020, ASAPbio will be hosting a live preprint review-a-thon. This session (1.5 h) will take place on September 22. We invite you to join us to set an all-time record for the most preprint reviews and comments in a single day.

Commentary and reviews on preprints provide authors with feedback to improve their work as well as valuable additional context to help readers interpret the findings. In alignment with Peer Review Week’s theme on Trust, we aim to support trust in preprints by encouraging constructive comments and reviews on preprints.

You are welcome to join even if you haven’t previously reviewed a paper. You will have an opportunity to learn a bit more about writing comments and reviews, share experiences, the flexibility to comment on a full paper or only elements of it, use a variety of tools and platforms, and to work alone or join a structured group.

Please fill out the form below to register for the event and tell us a bit more about your preferences for the session. …”

Preprint info center – ASAPbio

“A preprint is a complete scientific manuscript that is uploaded by the authors to a public server.  The preprint contains complete data and methodologies; it is often the same manuscript being submitted to a journal (see FAQ on submitting preprints).  After a brief quality-control inspection to ensure that the work is scientific in nature, the author’s manuscript is posted within a day or so on the Web without peer review and can be viewed without charge by anyone in the world. Based upon feedback and/or new data, new versions of your preprint can be submitted; however, prior preprint versions are also retained.  Preprint servers allow scientists to directly control the dissemination of their work to the world-wide scientific community. In most cases, the same work posted as preprint also is submitted for peer review at a journal.  Thus, preprints (rapid, but not validated through peer-review) and journal publication (slow, but providing validation using peer-review) work in parallel as a communication system for scientific research….”

 

Benefits and concerns regarding preprints

“This survey is being conducted by ASAPbio (a researcher-led non-profit working to promote the productive use of preprints, see asapbio.org) and attendees of #bioPreprints2020 (asapbio.org/building-trust-in-preprints-together) to understand perceptions of benefits and concerns of preprinting across a broad group of stakeholders. It should take less than 5 minutes to complete. No personally identifiable information will be collected unless you opt-in to discuss your opinions about preprints further. Responses (excluding any email addresses collected as a result of opting-in) will be shared publicly, aggregated across geographic, disciplinary, or professional categories.”

The ASAPbio Fellow program – ASAPbio

“We are keen to support those with an interest in learning more about preprints and in developing skills to equip you in becoming a resource for your community. If you are interested in a more structured training and support program, then do apply for the ASAPbio Fellow program – this is a six-month program structured to provide participants with the tools and skills they need to drive discussions about the productive use of preprints in the life sciences, and to become ASAPbio representatives at their institutions or scientific conferences.>