Conversation with Philip Hess, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel  Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society

“In today’s episode we feature an interview of Philip Hess, Head of Publisher Relations, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society.  The interview was conducted by Matthew Ismail, Director of Collection Development, University of Central Michigan. 

We’ll hear from Philip and Marcel about a German OA project that focuses on supporting small, non-APC, scholar-led journals. It’s a Knowledge Unlatched and Humboldt University project.

Philipp Hess is currently the Head of Publisher Relations at Knowledge Unlatched and is pursuing a complimentary master’s degree at the University of St. Gallen and the University of Arts Berlin in Leadership in digital Innovation. Before that he studied Engineering and Industrial Design in the Netherlands and Japan, before getting into scholarly content while working in the Management Department for Kiron, a platform that offers higher education to refugees. His goal is to make knowledge accessible to everyone, everywhere and to help shape the future dissemination of scholarly content.

Marcel Wrzesinski is an Open Access Officer at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society and works in the research project “Sustainable journal financing through consortial support structures in small and interdisciplinary subjects” (in cooperation with Knowledge Unlatched). Prior to this, he led Open Access activities at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (Giessen) and developed transformation strategies for gender studies at Freie Universität (Berlin). He is an editor of two open access journals, headed various working groups on digital publishing, and advises research institutions on Open Access and Open Science. His interests lie in fostering and sustaining Open Access in smaller and interdisciplinary fields….”

Awareness of predatory journals and open access publishing among orthopaedic and trauma surgeons – results from an online survey in Germany | BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders | Full Text

Abstract:  Background

Along with emerging open access journals (OAJ) predatory journals increasingly appear. As they harm accurate and good scientific research, we aimed to examine the awareness of predatory journals and open access publishing among orthopaedic and trauma surgeons.

Methods

In an online survey between August and December 2019 the knowledge on predatory journals and OAJ was tested with a hyperlink made available to the participants via the German Society for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery (DGOU) email distributor.

Results

Three hundred fifty orthopaedic and trauma surgeons participated, of which 291 complete responses (231 males (79.4%), 54 females (18.6%) and 5?N/A (2.0%)) were obtained. 39.9% were aware of predatory journals. However, 21.0% knew about the “Directory of Open Access Journals” (DOAJ) as a register for non-predatory open access journals. The level of profession (e.g. clinic director, consultant) (p =?0.018) influenced the awareness of predatory journals. Interestingly, participants aware of predatory journals had more often been listed as corresponding authors (p <?0.001) and were well published as first or last author (p <?0.001). Awareness of OAJ was masked when journal selection options did not to provide any information on the editorial board, the peer review process or the publication costs.

Conclusion

The impending hazard of predatory journals is unknown to many orthopaedic and trauma surgeons. Early stage clinical researchers must be trained to differentiate between predatory and scientifically accurate journals.

The Impact of the German ‘DEAL’ on Competition in the Academic Publishing Market by Justus Haucap, Nima Moshgbar, Wolfgang Benedikt Schmal :: SSRN

Abstract:  The German DEAL agreements between German universities and research institutions on the one side and Springer Nature and Wiley on the other side facilitate easy open access publishing for researchers located in Germany. We use a dataset of all publications in chemistry from 2016 to 2020 and apply a difference-in-differences approach to estimate the impact on eligible scientists’ choice of publication outlet. We find that even in the short period following the conclusion of these DEAL agreements, publication patterns in the field of chemistry have changed, as eligible researchers have increased their publications in Wiley and Springer Nature journals at the cost of other journals. From that two related competition concerns emerge: First, academic libraries may be, at least in the long run, left with fewer funds and incentives to subscribe to non-DEAL journals published by smaller publishers or to fund open access publications in these journals. Secondly, eligible authors may prefer to publish in journals included in the DEAL agreements, thereby giving DEAL journals a competitive advantage over non-DEAL journals in attracting good papers. Given the two-sided market nature of the academic journal market, these effects may both further spur the concentration process in this market.

 

Plan S and funding

This presentation was given by Johan Rooryck during the Open Access Talk on 29 October 2020. Johan Rooryck, Professor at Leiden University and Executive Director of cOAlition S, briefly outlines the rationale for the principles of Plan S. Beyond that, he discusses its implementation for all grants awarded by cOAlition S funders from 1 January 2021, including the Horizon Europe framework. In his talk, Johan Rooryck covers the following questions: Which conditions do you need to fulfil to publish in a journal of your choice under Plan S? What can the newly developed Journal Checker Tool do for you? How does the recent Rights Retention Strategy help you to keep the rights to your Author Accepted Manuscript? In addition, Johan Rooryck mentions a number of other projects initiated by cOAlition S, such as the Price Transparency Framework to ensure that prices for publishing services become more transparent and fair or the commission of a study to identify concrete funding mechanisms to support and strengthen diamond journals and their platforms. The lecture “Plan S and funding – What is going to change?” was held as part of the Open Access Talk online series of the BMBF-funded project open-access.network.

GRN · German Reproducibility Network

“The German Reproducibility Network (GRN) is a cross-disciplinary consortium that aims to increase trustworthiness and transparency of scientific research by investigating and encouraging the factors that contribute to robust research. We promote training activities and disseminate best practices, conduct and support meta-scientific research, and work with stakeholders to ensure coordination of efforts. GRN’s activities span multiple levels, including researchers, institutions and other stakeholders (e.g., funders, publishers, and Academic Societies)….”

DFG – Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft – DFG setzt neue Akzente für Open Access

From Google’s English:  “The German Research Foundation (DFG) is stepping up its efforts to ensure free access to publications and other research results online. In order to support Open Access and adapt it to the changing requirements of science and research, the DFG has decided and implemented further measures. These are networked with one another and range from improved framework conditions to the financing of publication costs and the development of a science-appropriate publication infrastructure to participation in national and international working groups….

The DFG readjusted its open access policy in 2020. Scientists are now asked to publish results from DFG-funded research projects in open access. To achieve this goal, the DFG supports both the financing of publication fees and the development of suitable publication infrastructures with its funding programs.

With its “Open Access Publication Costs” program, which was introduced in autumn 2020, the DFG grants subsidies for publication fees. Both the fees for journal articles and for Open Access monographs can be funded. Many universities and non-university research institutions are faced with the financial challenge that publishers charge for the publication of research results in Open Access. The new program is intended to support the institutions and their scientists in the Open Access transformation.

 

In addition to funding publication fees, the various specialist communities in Germany are dependent on the further development of science-friendly standards and infrastructures. With the newly accentuated funding program “Infrastructures for Scientific Publishing” , the DFG supports the Open Access transformation by setting up and expanding suitable publication infrastructures and thus also promotes the (further) development of structural framework conditions for the publication system….”

Informationsplattform Open Access: DFG stärkt Engagement für Open Access

From Google’s English:  “The German Research Foundation (DFG) is taking promising measures to drive the Open Access transformation forward. In advance, she had revised her Open Access Policy: Researchers are now asked to publish DFG-funded results in Open Access.

In January 2021, the DFG will start its new Infrastructures for Scientific Publishing program , the main goals of which are to promote the Open Access transformation through the establishment and expansion of suitable publication infrastructures and the (further) development of structural framework conditions. As early as autumn 2020, the DFG introduced the Open Access Publication  Costs funding program, which subsidizes the publication fees for open access journal articles and monographs….”

OPERAS-GER: Vermittler zwischen europäischen und deutschen Forschungsinfrastrukturen (OPERAS-GER: Intermediary between European and German research infrastructures) | open-access.net

(translated via deepl.com)

Initiative for Open Access and Open Scholarly Communication in the Social Sciences and Humanities begins work The National Contact Point OPERAS-GER – a cooperation between OPERAS and the Max Weber Foundation – has started its work. The new service is intended to anchor the services and resources for science communication in the social sciences and humanities provided by OPERAS at the European level in the German science landscape and to create intensive networking between the research infrastructures of the EU and Germany. Further goals are to strengthen Open Science and promote the FAIR principles. As part of the OPERAS-GER project, the Max Weber Foundation, which has already been committed to Open Access in the social sciences and humanities since 2017, is planning a series of online seminars and lectures as well as application-oriented workshops for the new services starting in June 2021. The project is based at the Max Weber Institute’s office and will be funded by the Federal Ministry of Research and Education (BMBF) from October 2020, initially for three years. OPERAS (Open Scholarly Communication In The European Research Area For Social Sciences And Humanities) provides infrastructural services for research institutions, libraries and publishers that serve to better organise research activities and make research results more visible in the sense of Open Science. The Max Weber Foundation – German Humanities Institutes Abroad promotes research with a focus on the fields of history, cultural studies, economics and social sciences in selected countries with the aim of improving mutual understanding. It maintains ten institutes, other research groups and offices worldwide and provides infrastructures for research in the humanities and social sciences. Source: www.maxweberstiftung.de/presse/aktuelles-presse/einzelansicht-pressemeldungen/detail/News/start-der-nationalen-kontaktstelle.html