What Data Repository Should I use? – a help article for using figshare

There is a home for every dataset. 

Ideally each subject would have a subject specific data repository with custom metadata capture and a subject specialist to curate the data. If there is a subject specific repository that is suitable for your datasets, use that one.

A list of subject specific repositories that are recommended by Scientific Data (Springer Nature) as being suitable for hosting data associated with peer-reviewed articles can be found here.

If there is no subject specific repository, you should check with your Institution’s Library as to whether they have a data repository. If they do, they will most likely have a team of data librarians to guide you through your dataset publication.
 

If there is no subject specific repository, you should upload and publish your data on Figshare.com, or another suitable generalist repository. How to upload and publish your data on Figshare.com
 

For more information on which repository to use, head to Re3Data ….”

Data Sharing in a Time of Pandemic: Patterns

“The resulting recommendations and guidelines on data sharing,

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 published in final form on Jun 30, 2020, are a thorough and comprehensive overview of how to share data (and research software) from multiple disciplines to inform response to a pandemic, along with guidelines and recommendations on data sharing under the present COVID-19 circumstances. It is a long document (more than 140 pages) but is very thorough and well structured….”

How can I get access to the article I need? | EIFL

“In order to help researchers retrieve legal copies of full-text articles that they can’t find in their library, EIFL has created a poster with useful links to other places where they can look for an article they need, such as open access search engines or browser extensions.

We are encouraging librarians to share the poster widely with faculty and students through their university and institutional websites, newsletters and social media. EIFL can help libraries customize the poster, for example, by adding the library’s logo and links to the library’s subscribed e-resources.”

How can I get access to the article I need? | EIFL

“In order to help researchers retrieve legal copies of full-text articles that they can’t find in their library, EIFL has created a poster with useful links to other places where they can look for an article they need, such as open access search engines or browser extensions.

We are encouraging librarians to share the poster widely with faculty and students through their university and institutional websites, newsletters and social media. EIFL can help libraries customize the poster, for example, by adding the library’s logo and links to the library’s subscribed e-resources.”

Open access checklist for books and chapters | Open research | Springer Nature

“Many research funders and institutions worldwide have introduced policies requiring authors to make their research openly accessible, whether through immediate open access publication, or through archiving a version of their manuscript in a repository. An increasing number of these policies apply to monographs and chapters in edited collections. Follow our open access checklist to help you meet the requirements of your funders and institutions, and identify potential sources of book processing charge (BPC) or chapter processing charge (CPC) funding if you are publishing OA.”

 

Open access checklist for books and chapters | Open research | Springer Nature

“Many research funders and institutions worldwide have introduced policies requiring authors to make their research openly accessible, whether through immediate open access publication, or through archiving a version of their manuscript in a repository. An increasing number of these policies apply to monographs and chapters in edited collections. Follow our open access checklist to help you meet the requirements of your funders and institutions, and identify potential sources of book processing charge (BPC) or chapter processing charge (CPC) funding if you are publishing OA.”

 

Open Repositories Conference Handbook – OR Steering Committee – LYRASIS Wiki

“This document is intended to serve both as an aide-memoire for the Open Repositories organization and as a loose guide for each year’s conference organisers. We attempt to keep this as up to date as possible, but there may be areas which are inaccurate. If you have questions, please contact the Chair of the Open Repositories Steering Committee..

Following the overview, the middle sections of the document are essentially a walk through of the conference “creation” process whilst the Appendices contain related documents that will be useful in the process….”

Is it Safe to Use? – Guidelines for re-using images from Wiki sites — Naomi Korn Associates

“When searching for images for commercial use we often turn to Wiki sites as first port of call, but are all the images safe to use for commercial purposes?  Not everything posted in the Commons or Media sites or used on a Wiki page is in fact open access. Some images (particularly in WikiPedia), are there with an explanation that they are used on the site because they are all over the web and nothing else could be found or the licence holder could not be found.  Not everything that says it is “Public Domain” or “Creative Commons 0” actually is, depending on where you live.

It is easy to scroll down to the rights section below the image, and open the blue “More Info” button to check what kind of licence the image carries. There are various types of “CC” licence and the letters after CC tell you whether any restrictions apply. Importantly, you may not be allowed to change the photo (eg crop it or incorporate it into another work (ND) or you may not be allowed to use it commercially (NC). Explanations for the various letter codes can be found here https://creativecommons.org/licenses/.

The issues I will consider fall roughly into two categories: works of art and contemporary photographs of landscapes and architecture. …”

Is it Safe to Use? – Guidelines for re-using images from Wiki sites — Naomi Korn Associates

“When searching for images for commercial use we often turn to Wiki sites as first port of call, but are all the images safe to use for commercial purposes?  Not everything posted in the Commons or Media sites or used on a Wiki page is in fact open access. Some images (particularly in WikiPedia), are there with an explanation that they are used on the site because they are all over the web and nothing else could be found or the licence holder could not be found.  Not everything that says it is “Public Domain” or “Creative Commons 0” actually is, depending on where you live.

It is easy to scroll down to the rights section below the image, and open the blue “More Info” button to check what kind of licence the image carries. There are various types of “CC” licence and the letters after CC tell you whether any restrictions apply. Importantly, you may not be allowed to change the photo (eg crop it or incorporate it into another work (ND) or you may not be allowed to use it commercially (NC). Explanations for the various letter codes can be found here https://creativecommons.org/licenses/.

The issues I will consider fall roughly into two categories: works of art and contemporary photographs of landscapes and architecture. …”