A collaborative approach to preserving at-risk open access journals | Zenodo

Abstract:  In the September 2020 preprint “Open is not forever”, (Laakso et al.) discuss the high number of Open Access journals that disappear from the web. It is a known problem in the digital preservation world that long-tail journals are especially at-risk of disappearing. Five leading parties are now collaborating to address this problem: the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), CLOCKSS, Internet Archive, the Public Knowledge Project Preservation Network (PKP PN), and International ISSN / Keepers Registry. Building from the existing DOAJ infrastructure, we are establishing a central hub where preservation agencies can harvest consistent metadata, and access full-text. Each of the preservation partners offers somewhat different solutions for publishers to preserve their content. The project will offer free and low-cost options for preservation and access. In the first phase, the target is diamond OA journals (those with no author processing charges), because these are the journals that are least likely to participate in a preservation service and hence are most at-risk of disappearing. The project is currently coordinating technical designs, service development, infrastructure, and sustainability planning.

 

CLOCKSS is Collaborating to Improve the Preservation of Open Access Journals – CLOCKSS

“DOAJ, CLOCKSS Archive, Internet Archive, Keepers Registry/ISSN International Centre and Public Knowledge Project (PKP) have agreed to partner to provide an alternative pathway for the preservation of small-scale, APC-free, Open Access journals.

The recent study authored by M.Laakso, L.Matthias, and N.Jahn has revived academia’s concern over the disappearance of the scholarly record disseminated in Open Access (OA) journals.

Their research focuses on OA journals as at risk of vanishing, and “especially small-scale and APC-free journals […] with limited financial resources” that often “opt for lightweight technical solutions” and “cannot afford to enroll in preservation schemes.” The authors have used data available in the Directory of Open Access Journals to come up with the conclusion that just under half of the journals indexed in DOAJ participate in preservation schemes. Their findings “suggest that current approaches to digital preservation are successful in archiving content from larger journals and established publishing houses but leave behind those that are more at risk.” They call for new preservation initiatives “to develop alternative pathways […] better suited for smaller journals that operate without the support of large, professional publishers.” …”

Executive Director – CLOCKSS

“CLOCKSS (Controlled LOCKSS) is a not-for-profit joint venture between the world’s leading scholarly publishers and academic libraries, whose mission is to build and operate a sustainable, geographically distributed digital preservation service with which to ensure the long-term survival of web-based scholarly publications for the benefit of the greater global research community. CLOCKSS is an international, mission-driven, partnership organization with technical support from the LOCKSS team at Stanford University.

The role of Executive Director is crucial to CLOCKSS. In this role you will run the organization, reporting to the Board via its Co-Chairs, and be responsible for continuing to establish the organization as a major international scholarly archive and as a valuable collaborative community of scholarly publishers and academic libraries….”

CLOCKSS ARCHIVE Announces the Trigger of Eleven Medknow Journals for Open Access – CLOCKSS

“The CLOCKSS Archive today announced that eleven journals have been triggered for open access by the CLOCKSS Board of Directors.

The triggers occurred after Medknow, part of Wolters Kluwer, ceased publishing eleven titles in 2019 and the content would no longer be available online. The publications have been preserved in the CLOCKSS Archive and are openly available to the public via a Creative Commons license….”

Save Tonight (and Fight the Rot of Bits): Open Access and Digital Preservation – Scholarly Communication in Raiderland

“I am writing to you about digital preservation, but this is a scholarly communication blog. So, let’s delve into what preservation has to do with open access. SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) defines open access as ‘the free, immediate, online availability of research articles, coupled with the rights to uses these articles fully in the digital environment.‘ The simple answer to what digital preservation has to do with access is that we are not only advocating for open access in the here and now but also for continued access in years to come.

In the traditional sense of open access, I will encourage you to pay attention to what open access publishers say about what they intend to do with the work that you submit to them. LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) and CLOCKSS (Controlled LOCKSS) are examples of programs designed to provide publishers with digital preservation tools and networks to ensure the safety of their content. If you are submitting your articles to a publisher who is openly involved with LOCKSS or CLOCKSS, then you can be reasonably assured that they have your best preservation interests at heart. But they’re not the only tools available to publishers, so be a good investigator when you explore your publication possibilities.

This introduction is the first part of two posts about digital preservation and access. Look out for the next post with four simple rules for incorporating digital preservation into your personal research routine.”