Datasets on arXiv. We’re excited to announce our… | by Robert Stojnic | PapersWithCode | May, 2021 | Medium

“We’re excited to announce our partnership with arXiv to support links to datasets on arXiv!

Machine learning articles on arXiv now have a Code & Data tab to link to datasets that are used or introduced in a paper….

This makes it much easier to track dataset usage across the community and quickly find other papers using the same dataset. From Papers with Code you can discover other papers using the same dataset, track usage over time, compare models and find similar datasets….”

2i2c: Interactive computing infrastructure for your community

“We make interactive computing more accessible and powerful for research and education. We strive to accelerate research and discovery, and to empower education to be more accessible, intuitive, and enjoyable. We do this through these primary actions: …”

The Customer Right to Replicate | 2i2c

“To ensure the Right to Replicate to our customers, 2i2c makes the following commitments to infrastructure we build and operate:

We MUST use only open source software to run our infrastructure. By only using software that is available to everyone on the same terms, we can ensure that customers can replicate the infrastructure without having to negotiate licensing terms with proprietary software vendors. In addition, any changes we make to open source software will be made in public and/or contributed upstream, so customers continue to have access to them regardless of where their infrastructure is.

We MUST NOT directly depend on proprietary cloud vendor specific products or APIs. Instead, we use cloud-managed open source software, or hide the dependency behind a layer of abstraction. This ensures that customers can port their infrastructure to any cloud provider of their choice, or run it on their own hardware with purely open source software.

This set of commitments acts as a business continuity plan for our customers, ensuring 2i2c will follow best practices within the open source, open education and open research ecosystems….”

Springer Nature and the University of California join together to better understand author attitudes to open research | Corporate Affairs Homepage | Springer Nature

“Springer Nature and the University of California (UC) today launched a new initiative to gain greater understanding of researcher attitudes to and motivations towards open research practices (including open access articles, data, and code; transparent peer review; and preprints). As part of the partnership, participating UC authors will also have the option to trial Guided Open Access (GOA) for some flagship Nature titles….”

Why researchers created a database of half a million journal editors | Nature Index

“In an attempt to capture that information, Pacher and his colleagues created Open Editors, a database containing information such as names, affiliations and editorial roles of just under half a million editors working for more than 6,000 journals run by 17 scholarly publishers.

They outline their initiative in a SocArXiv preprint paper published on 11 March.

Although Open Editors already includes editor data from publishing heavyweights such as Elsevier and Cambridge University Press, Pacher says, other major players such as Springer Nature, John Wiley & Sons, and Taylor and Francis are so far missing.

Pacher has made the data and code freely available to encourage other academics to help build the database….”

Principles of open, transparent and reproducible science in author guidelines of sleep research and chronobiology journals

Abstract:  Background: “Open science” is an umbrella term describing various aspects of transparent and open science practices. The adoption of practices at different levels of the scientific process (e.g., individual researchers, laboratories, institutions) has been rapidly changing the scientific research landscape in the past years, but their uptake differs from discipline to discipline. Here, we asked to what extent journals in the field of sleep research and chronobiology encourage or even require following transparent and open science principles in their author guidelines.

Methods: We scored the author guidelines of a comprehensive set of 27 sleep and chronobiology journals, including the major outlets in the field, using the standardised Transparency and Openness (TOP) Factor. The TOP Factor is a quantitative summary of the extent to which journals encourage or require following various aspects of open science, including data citation, data transparency, analysis code transparency, materials transparency, design and analysis guidelines, study pre-registration, analysis plan pre-registration, replication, registered reports, and the use of open science badges.

Results: Across the 27 journals, we find low values on the TOP Factor (median [25 th, 75 th percentile] 3 [1, 3], min. 0, max. 9, out of a total possible score of 29) in sleep research and chronobiology journals.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest an opportunity for sleep research and chronobiology journals to further support recent developments in transparent and open science by implementing transparency and openness principles in their author guidelines.

Collaborating with our community to increase code sharing

“Given how essential newly developed code can be to computational biology research we have been collaborating with the Editorial Board of PLOS Computational Biology and consulting with computational biology researchers to develop a new more-rigorous code policy that is intended to increase code sharing on publication of articles….”

Generalizing FAIR – Daniel S. Katz’s blog

“Most researchers and policymakers support the idea of making research, and specifically research outputs, findable, accessible, interoperably, and reusable (FAIR). The concept of FAIR has been well-developed for research data, but this is not the case for all research products. This blog post seeks to consider how the application of FAIR to a range of research products (beyond data) could result in the development of different sets of principles for applying FAIR to different research objects, and to ask about the implications of this….