University of Maryland PACT (Publishing, Access, and Contract Terms)

“As the state of Maryland’s flagship institution and one of the nation’s preeminent public research universities, we are committed to action that will make Maryland’s research more visible, accessible, affordable, and transparent….

Our current scholarly publishing and communication ecosystem is in crisis. University of Maryland researchers are on the front lines of developing innovative solutions to urgent problems that threaten the well-being and health of the planet and people across the globe. Yet, trends in international publishing make it increasingly difficult to provide equitable access to the publicly funded research that can help our communities thrive and make our lives better. Learn how you can take action and be part of the movement for open and equitable scholarship….”

OAI12 – OAI

“Scholarly publishing is highly diverse and constantly changing. Over the previous decades it has responded to a number of large challenges on the global and local levels. In this session we aim to take a snapshot of the current status of the industry with a global perspective and explore emerging models of open publishing. Which open access strategies can work together, and which lead to conflict? How do we value the diversity of models, and where do we need clear and more uniform strategies? What challenges do scholar-led, community-owned publishing initiatives face? What impact can we expect from transformative agreements and other big deals in the different regions of the world? Are the Plan S principles applicable worldwide, are they necessary or sufficient? How sustainable are existing open access strategies and business models? ”

Librarian for Scholarly Communications Job Opening in Nashville, Tennessee – ALA JobLIST | Jobs in Library & Information Science & Technology

“The Librarian for Scholarly Communications supports Open research, communication, and data on the Vanderbilt University campus through education, training, and analysis. As a member of the Digital Scholarship and Communications (DiSC) Office, the Librarian for Scholarly Communications consults with faculty, students, and staff about emergent scholarly communications models, analyzes faculty publishing patterns and impact metrics, and evaluates and advises on research communication tools. The Librarian for Scholarly Communications also manages the institutional repository, coordinating the ingestion workflow in dialogue with liaison librarians in the divisional libraries, and with LTDS in software development….”

Laura Hanscom named head of Scholarly Communications and Collections Strategy | MIT Libraries News

“Laura Hanscom has been appointed the head of the department of Scholarly Communications and Collections Strategy (SCCS), the MIT Libraries announced today. In this position, she will lead MIT Libraries services and staff in transforming models of scholarly publishing to increase the impact and reach of research and scholarship and promote open, equitable, and sustainable publishing and access models. The SCCS head also coordinates overall collection management strategy for the Libraries’ general collections, as well as vendor negotiations and repository services. Hanscom began serving in her new role April 12, 2021. …”

“No Publication Favelas! Latin America’s Vision for Open Access” by Monica Berger | ACRL 2021 presentation

by Monica Berger, CUNY New York City College of Technology

Abstract: Open access was intended to be the great equalizer but its promise has not come to fruition in many lower-income countries of the Global South. Under-resourcing is only one of the many reasons why these scholars and publishers are marginalized. In order to examine inequality in our global scholarly communications system, we can compare a negative and a positive outgrowth of this imbalance. Predatory publishing represents a a weak imitation of traditional, commercial journal publishing. In contrast, Latin America’s community-based, quality scholarly infrastructure is anti-colonial. It can be argued that Latin America’s publishing infrastructure represents one solution to predatory publishing. As the future of open access is debated, it is critical that we look to Latin America as we support new models that reject legacy commercial journal publishing and support bibliodiversity.

Jeffrey Beall infamously called Brazil’s SciELO a “publishing favela” or slum. Yet Latin America represents an important exception to the problem of underdevelopment of scholarly communications in the Global South. In order to begin to better understand the marginalization of the Global South and Latin America’s success, we need to unpack the history of open access, its overemphasis on the reader as opposed to the author, and how notions of development influenced its discourse. This focus on the reader is neo-Colonialist, positioning scholars from the Global South as “downloaders” and not “uploaders,” whose scholarship is peripheral.

Lacking alternative publishing options, predatory publishing, or amateurish, low quality publishing, exploited this gap. In its pathetic imitation of international, corporate publishing, predatory publishing is neo-Colonial and a form of “faux” open access where subaltern authors, editors, and publishers poorly imitate Global North corporate publishing. Predatory publishing is a sad simulacra with real world damage. Since predatory publishing is overwhelming based in the Global South and many of its authors based in the Global South, it tarnishes the reputation of all scholarship from less developed countries. In contrast, predatory authorship and publishing are rare in Latin America.

Latin America is an exemplar of sustainable and humane open access. Heather Morrison deemed Latin American as a “long-time peerless leader in open access.” The advent of Plan S, a rapid flip to open access, is accelerating the co-option of open access by large, commercial publishers predicating a variety of negative outcomes. In contrast, the Latin American concept of bibliodiversity represents an important alternative model. No one size fits all and a local vision governs. Bibliodiversity interrogates the presumption that all scholarship must be English-language. It also values indigenous and local knowledge as well as lay readers. Redalyc and SciELO include measures for research collaboration. Various regional scholarly organizations cooperate, sharing expertise, providing training in editorial and technical best practices. This cooperation has expanded to a global scale. The Confederation of Open Access Repositories and SPARC are partnering with LA Referencia and others, expanding Latin America’s vision globally, generating a meaningful alternative model for open access.

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Slides with talk transcript and sources as presented at the Association of College and Research Libraries conference, ACRL 2021: Ascending into an Open Future, held virtually, April 16, 2021.

Why researchers created a database of half a million journal editors | Nature Index

“In an attempt to capture that information, Pacher and his colleagues created Open Editors, a database containing information such as names, affiliations and editorial roles of just under half a million editors working for more than 6,000 journals run by 17 scholarly publishers.

They outline their initiative in a SocArXiv preprint paper published on 11 March.

Although Open Editors already includes editor data from publishing heavyweights such as Elsevier and Cambridge University Press, Pacher says, other major players such as Springer Nature, John Wiley & Sons, and Taylor and Francis are so far missing.

Pacher has made the data and code freely available to encourage other academics to help build the database….”

San Jose State University – Details – Scholarly Communications & Digital Scholarship Librarian

“The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library at San José  State University (San José , CA) seeks a service-oriented, innovative, and collaborative individual for the full-time, tenure-track position of Scholarly Communications & Digital Scholarship Librarian. This position is one of three that will be hired in 2021–STEM Librarian, iSchool Librarian, and Scholarly Communications & Digital Scholarship Librarian–providing a supportive cohort to the successful candidate. The Library is striving to increase the diversity of its faculty and encourages all members of underrepresented groups to apply….”

Scholarly Communication After COVID – Major Research Report Available Now

“The effect of the pandemic on research funding, university budgets, and researchers’ needs

The coronavirus pandemic has both disrupted research, and acted as a catalyst for change. Publishers, societies and providers of related services urgently need intelligence and analysis to inform short-term responses and longer-term planning.

“This study, carried out between November 2020 and February 2021, provides up-to-the-minute insight drawn from two global surveys (with responses from 10,000+ researchers and 600+ librarians) and a review of over 100 announcements, articles and other relevant documents from funders, institutions and researchers.

Expert analysis highlights the key implications, identifies the emerging opportunities, and sets out clear recommendations for putting the report’s findings into practice….”

Scholarly Communication After COVID – Major Research Report Available Now

“The effect of the pandemic on research funding, university budgets, and researchers’ needs

The coronavirus pandemic has both disrupted research, and acted as a catalyst for change. Publishers, societies and providers of related services urgently need intelligence and analysis to inform short-term responses and longer-term planning.

“This study, carried out between November 2020 and February 2021, provides up-to-the-minute insight drawn from two global surveys (with responses from 10,000+ researchers and 600+ librarians) and a review of over 100 announcements, articles and other relevant documents from funders, institutions and researchers.

Expert analysis highlights the key implications, identifies the emerging opportunities, and sets out clear recommendations for putting the report’s findings into practice….”