What We Talk About When We Talk About… Book Usage Data

“Over the last two-and-a-half years, we have been working as part of the EU-funded HIRMEOS (High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science Infrastructure) project to create open source software and databases to collectively gather and host usage data from various platforms for multiple publishers. As part of this work, we have been thinking deeply about what the data we collect actually means. Open Access books are read on, and downloaded from, many different platforms – this availability is one of the benefits of making work available Open Access, after all – but each platform has a different way of counting up the number of times a book has been viewed or downloaded.

Some platforms count a group of visits made to a book by the same user within a continuous time frame (known as a session) as one ‘view’ – we measure usage in this way ourselves on our own website – but the length of a session might vary from platform to platform. For example, on our website we use Google Analytics, according to which one session (or ‘view’) lasts until there is thirty minutes of inactivity. But platforms that use COUNTER-compliant figures (the standard that libraries prefer) have a much shorter time-frame for a single session – and such a platform would record more ‘views’ than a platform that uses Google Analytics, even if it was measuring the exact same pattern of use.[2]

Other platforms simply count each time a book is accessed (known as a visit) as one ‘view’. There might be multiple visits by the same user within a short time frame – which our site would count as one session, or one ‘view’ – but which a platform counting visits rather than sessions would record as multiple ‘views’.

Downloads (which we also used to include in the number of ‘views’) also present problems. For example, many sites only allow chapter downloads (e.g. JSTOR), others only whole book downloads (e.g. OAPEN), and some allow both (e.g. our own website). How do you combine these different types of data? Somebody who wants to read the whole book would need only one download from OAPEN, but as many downloads as there are chapters from JSTOR – thus inflating the number of downloads for a book that has many chapters.

So aggregating this data into a single figure for ‘views’ isn’t only comparing apples with oranges – it’s mixing apples, oranges, grapes, kiwi fruit and pears. It’s a fruit salad….”

Open Book Publishers are looking for an Editorial Assistant! | OBP

Open Book Publishers is looking for an Editorial Assistant. This is a rare and exciting opportunity to gain first-hand editorial experience working for an innovative and fast-growing academic publisher.

Based in Cambridge, we are a not-for-profit, Open Access publisher of high-quality monographs in the humanities and social sciences. The position is ideally suited to a Master’s or PhD student in the humanities or social sciences, either currently studying or recently graduated. S/he must have a passion for academic publishing, a good eye for detail and a willingness to lend a hand in all aspects of the organisation. Knowledge of the Microsoft Office package, InDesign and Photoshop would be an advantage, although not essential.

Duties will include:

Copy-editing/proofreading manuscripts
Communicating with authors
Formatting indices and footnotes
Contributions to social media channels

The position is full-time (40hrs/week). Initially the work will be remote, but the candidate should be prepared to work from our offices in central Cambridge (UK) in the future. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with experience, starting at a full-time equivalent rate of £22,000-£25,000 per annum. Interviews will be held during the Summer. Closing date for applications: 20th of July 2020.

Further information about Open Book Publishers can be found on our website: www.openbookpublishers.com.
To apply, please email a CV and covering letter to Alessandra Tosi: a.tosi@openbookpublishers.com.

Open Book Publishers are looking for an Editorial Assistant! | OBP

Open Book Publishers is looking for an Editorial Assistant. This is a rare and exciting opportunity to gain first-hand editorial experience working for an innovative and fast-growing academic publisher.

Based in Cambridge, we are a not-for-profit, Open Access publisher of high-quality monographs in the humanities and social sciences. The position is ideally suited to a Master’s or PhD student in the humanities or social sciences, either currently studying or recently graduated. S/he must have a passion for academic publishing, a good eye for detail and a willingness to lend a hand in all aspects of the organisation. Knowledge of the Microsoft Office package, InDesign and Photoshop would be an advantage, although not essential.

Duties will include:

Copy-editing/proofreading manuscripts
Communicating with authors
Formatting indices and footnotes
Contributions to social media channels

The position is full-time (40hrs/week). Initially the work will be remote, but the candidate should be prepared to work from our offices in central Cambridge (UK) in the future. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with experience, starting at a full-time equivalent rate of £22,000-£25,000 per annum. Interviews will be held during the Summer. Closing date for applications: 20th of July 2020.

Further information about Open Book Publishers can be found on our website: www.openbookpublishers.com.
To apply, please email a CV and covering letter to Alessandra Tosi: a.tosi@openbookpublishers.com.

Fair OA publishers, infrastructures and initiatives supported by KU Leuven | KU Leuven Open Science

KU Leuven promotes non-commercial and community-owned approaches of OA, especially through the KU Leuven Fund for Fair OA. On the one hand, the fund supports innovative publishing initiatives and infrastructures. On the other hand, the fund covers membership costs for consortia and advocacy organizations focusing on a non-commercial approach to scholarly communication. On this page you can find an overview of everything that KU Leuven endorses.

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OBP’s draft response to the UKRI Open Access consultation

“Here we share our draft response to the UKRI Open Access consultation. We will answer the questions that pertain to books and chapters, since that is our area of expertise.

Please annotate this post with any thoughts or relevant evidence you wish to share (we have integrated Hypothes.is to make this easy to do). Please also feel free to draw on our answers when writing your own response, if you are submitting one.

If you would like to express support for the arguments made here, you can sign this Google doc, which will be submitted as part of our response. If we make any changes to this draft response, they will be posted on this blog by noon on Thursday 28 May (24 hours before UKRI’s deadline) in case you wish to see the final version before signing….”

Vacancies, Training & Volunteering – Open Book Publishers

“Open Book Publishers (OBP) is seeking to appoint a European Co-ordinator as part of the OPERAS-P (Open Scholarly Communication in the European Research Area for Social Sciences and Humanities – Preparation) project.

The European Co-ordinator will facilitate exchange between the various library and scholarly publishing communities within the EU, and the international Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM) project.

 

This is a fixed-term, 18-month position funded by the EU through the OPERAS-P project….”