Open Access and Art History in the 21st Century: The Case for Open GLAM – CODART CODART

“Almost 1000 cultural heritage institutions around the world1 have published some or all of their online collections for free reuse, modification and sharing. They are part of the ‘Open GLAM’ (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums) movement that views liberal access2 and reuse (where culturally appropriate3) of digital collections as fundamental to education, research and public engagement.

A key principle of Open GLAM is that works in the public domain – in which copyright has expired or never existed – should remain in the public domain once digitized. However, many museums do assert copyright in digital reproductions of public domain artworks. How legally legitimate is this? Although the answer is not straightforward (the relevant copyright law is complex and lacks international harmonization), in the European Union the standard of originality for a new copyright requires that the work be the ‘author’s own intellectual creation’….”

Round 2: Honoraria for Art Historians impacted by Covid-19, an emergency response – Smarthistory

“Now, thanks to support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Smarthistory is able to offer thirty additional $1,000 honoraria to emerging scholars who have suffered financial hardship due to the pandemic. 

These honoraria are available for the successful publication, on Smarthistory, of a short, accessible essay of general interest and in the scholar’s area of specialization (the topic will be determined in consultation with the editors at Smarthistory), and is open to active Ph.D. students who are ABD, as well as those who have earned a Ph.D. in art history within the past two years. Smarthistory essays are aimed at non-specialist, undergraduate learners….

Authors will retain intellectual property rights to their work and will grant the right for Smarthistory to publish the resulting essay with a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License across all of its channels including Smarthistory.org and Khanacademy.org. Essays must be submitted before March 1, 2020. The acceptance of essays and the awarding of honoraria will be at the sole discretion of Smarthistory….”

PHAROS: A digital research space for photo archives | Art Libraries Journal | Cambridge Core

Abstract:  The PHAROS consortium of fourteen international art historical photo archives is digitizing the over 20 million images (with accompanying documentation) in its combined collections and has begun to construct a common access platform using Linked Open Data and the ResearchSpace software. In addition to resulting in a rich and substantial database of images for art-historical research, the PHAROS initiative supports the development of shared standards for mapping and sharing photo archive metadata, as well as for best practices for working with large digital image collections and conducting computational image analysis. Moreover, alongside their digitization efforts, PHAROS member institutions are considering the kinds of art-historical questions the resulting database of images could be used to research. This article indicates some of the prospective research directions stimulated by modern technologies, with the aim of exploring the epistemological potential of photographic archives and challenging the boundaries between the analogue and the digital.