Open Access for the Development of Africa’s Science | National Research Foundation

“The 2016 Dakar Declaration on Open Science in Africa called for urgent action by institutions and governments for open access in order to better Science in Africa. Two years later, the continent is making strides in this direction.  

In this lecture Professor Ismail Serageldin – Advocate for Open Science in Africa, Founding Director of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt and Former Vice-President of the World Bank – will share his insights and explore the case for the combined power of scholarly information in the service of the public good in Africa.”

Will open access increase journal CiteScores? An empirical investigation over multiple disciplines

 

 

This paper empirically studies the effect of Open Access on journal CiteScores. We have found that the general effect is positive but not uniform across different types of journals. In particular, we investigate two types of heterogeneous treatment effect: (1) the differential treatment effect among journals grouped by academic field, publisher, and tier; and (2) differential treatment effects of Open Access as a function of propensity to be treated. The results are robust to a number of sensitivity checks and falsification tests. Our findings shed new light on Open Access effect on journals and can help stakeholders of journals in the decision of adopting the Open Access policy.

The Landscape of Open Data Policies

Transparency is essential for scientific progress. Access to underlying data and materials allows us to make progress through new discoveries and to better evaluate reported findings, which increases trust in science. However, there are challenges to changing norms of scientific practice. Culture change is a slow process because of inertia and the fear of unintended consequences.

One barrier to change that we encounter as we advocate to journals for more data sharing is an editor’s uncertainty about how their publisher will react to such a change. Will they help implement that policy? Will they discourage it because of uncertainty about how it might affect submission numbers or citation rates? With uncertainty, inaction seems to be easier.

California Bill Is a Win for Access to Scientific Research

“The California legislature just scored a huge win in the fight for open access to scientific research. Now it’s up to Governor Jerry Brown to sign it. Under A.B. 2192—which passed both houses unanimously—all peer-reviewed, scientific research funded by the state of California would be made available to the public no later than one year after publication. There’s a similar law on the books in California right now, but it only applies to research funded by the Department of Public Health, and it’s set to expire in 2020. A.B. 2192 would extend it indefinitely and expand it to cover research funded by any state agency.”

Harvard upgrades DASH DSpace repository | Atmire

Harvard just upgraded its DSpace repository, DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard). 

Quoting Peter Suber, director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication: “We’re very happy with the upgrade to DASH. For nine years we’d been using an early version of DSpace, heavily customized for our needs. It gave us exactly what we wanted and worked beautifully. But the constant tweaking took its toll. The upgrade embraces all our major customizations, reduces our maintenance load, makes it easier for new developers to join the project, and adds features we couldn’t easily have added on our own.”

Combining citizen science and deep learning to amplify expertise in neuroimaging

“It is therefore essential that we develop systems that can accurately emulate expert decisions, and that these systems are made openly available for the scientific community.

To demonstrate how citizen science and deep learning can be combined to amplify expertise in neuroimaging, we developed a citizen-science amplification and CNN procedure for the openly available Healthy Brain Network dataset…”

MIT and Harvard: When Elite Institutions Hack & Open Knowledge – #Coworkers #Makers #Hackers #Futureofwork

“Between the 25th and the 28th of July 2018, we co-created a very rich learning expedition organized by the Research Group on Collaborative Spaces (RGCS), at MIT and Harvard University, in Cambridge (MA). This alternative academic network focuses on topics about new work practices inspired by open science and citizen science cultures.”