Shared Investment in OSF Sustainability

“We launched the Open Science Framework (OSF) in 2012 as infrastructure to support our mission to change the research culture toward openness, integrity, and reproducibility. With OSF, our goal is to make rigor and transparency enhancing behaviors possible, easy, and efficient to ease onboarding of researchers who are responding to shifting cultural norms, incentives, and policies promoting open research. Like many other service providers in the open research community, we have been amazed at the enthusiasm and pace of the community adopting open research. For example, our user base has grown non-linearly every year and recently hit 250,000 registered users….

Google provides hosting services for OSF, and the bill for storage and hosting has been increasing an average of 5% per month, every month. At this rate, within a few years, the entire budget for the Center for Open Science would be going to Google.  

COS’s sustainability model begins with its $250,000 preservation fund, which ensures data hosted on OSF will remain should COS ever close its doors. We also actively collaborate with groups such as Internet Archive to distribute and steward long-term access to open research data by implementing sustainable infrastructure for libraries, open repositories, and other data curators….

Starting November 3, 2020, OSF will limit the storage capacity for private projects to 5 GB of OSF Storage, and 50 GB for public projects. Please take a moment to learn more and review what these storage changes may mean for you, your collaborators, and your existing storage workflows….”

Clarivate Collaboration with Open Access Monitor Germany to Provide Web of Science Data Across DACH region

” Clarivate Plc (NYSE:CCC), a global leader in providing trusted information and insights to accelerate the pace of innovation, is supporting the Open Access Monitor (OA Monitor), Germany with the provision of Web of Science™ publication, grant and funding data to increase the impact of scientific scholarship and to enable more equitable participation in research. Clarivate™ will provide weekly customised data from the Web of Science covering the publication literature for the DACH region (which includes Germany, Switzerland and Austria).   

Supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and managed by Forschungszentrum Jülich, the OA Monitor provides evaluations of both the volume and financing of publications at federal, state and institutional level in the DACH region. The ability to connect the corresponding author data from the Web of Science with the publication fee information sourced by OA Monitor will have particularly broad implications for the German academic library community. The data will also help policy makers gauge the status of the transformation to Open Access (OA).  …”

OA Books Toolkit

The OAPEN Open Access Books Toolkit covers specific topics related to open access books. Each article offers a quick and brief introduction to a particular aspect of open access book publishing. The toolkit also serves as a signposting tool: articles include a list of sources referenced, further reading and links to definitions of key terms.

Digitization Coordinator in Manhattan, New York | Careers at The New York Public Library

“The New York Public Library seeks an extremely organized, detail-oriented person to serve as the Library’s Digitization Coordinator. The successful candidate will work closely with the Library’s curators, research divisions, digital imaging unit, metadata services, permissions office, rights clearance team, registrar, conservation units, and collections strategy department to shepherd the digitization of the Library’s myriad collections through the digitization workflows so that digitized collection items can be made available as broadly as possible for patron use and reuse.”

OA Switchboard initiative: progress report September 2020 – OASPA

“The OA Switchboard is now a reality: the MVP (Minimum Viable Product), currently in its pilot phase, has delivered a neutral information exchange ‘hub’, streamlining the communication between funders, institutions and publishers regarding OA publications. The OA Switchboard will reduce the complexity in the implementation of multi-lateral Open Access publication-level arrangements, ensuring a financial settlement can be done.

In essence, the OA Switchboard enables funders, institutions and publishers to send and receive a defined set of standardised messages between them, ideally in an automated, integrated, and scalable manner. 

OASPA is extremely proud that the 2020 project we are overseeing is completely on track, both in time and budget. Over the summer the MVP (as the first step towards this essential infrastructure) was developed in close collaboration with representatives of all stakeholder groups. We have held many plenary and 1-to-1 meetings with stakeholders and experts and have regularly reported on progress. …”

Charting a path to a more open future. . . together – Hanging Together

“Last week, representatives from OCLC Research and LIBER (the Association of European Research Libraries) presented a webinar to kick off the OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion Series. This discussion series, which takes place from 24 September through 5 November 2020, is based upon the LIBER Open Science Roadmap, and will help guide research libraries in envisioning the support infrastructure for Open Science (OS) and their role at local, national, and global levels.

OCLC and LIBER had initially planned a collaborative in-person workshop to take place at the OCLC Library Futures Conference (EMEARC 2020) on March 3 in Vienna. But with COVID rapidly advancing globally at that time, the event was cancelled, and we took some time to plan a larger series of webinars and discussions. 

There are a couple of key goals for our collaboration. First of all, our organizations want to jointly offer a forum for discussion and exploration, and to collectively stimulate the exchange of ideas. But secondly, we want this activity to also inform us as we seek to identify research questions that OCLC and LIBER can collaboratively address to advance Open Science. 

The LIBER Open Science Roadmap provides an excellent, well. . . roadmap. . . for this effort. The report calls upon libraries to “advocate for Open Science locally and internationally, to support Open Science through tools and services and to expand the impact of their work through collaboration and partnerships.” …”

COAPI Community Call: Funding Open During Challenging Budget Times – Oct 26, 2020 – SPARC

“During this call, you will hear about the SPARC Journal Negotiation Community of Practice, including a brief overview of programs and discussion groups developed for libraries in support of their current negotiations and subscription decision-making. The call will then focus in on one of these programs, the Journal Cancellation Reinvestment Working Group. Co-leads, Kathleen DeLaurenti (Johns Hopkins University) and Curtis Brundy (Iowa State University) will describe their efforts leading a community of librarian volunteers developing resources to support libraries prioritizing Open investments.”

News – The Open Library of Humanities Celebrates its 5th Birthday

“The Open Library of Humanities today celebrates its 5th anniversary since we launched our platform on 28th September 2015 with only 7 journals and 99 supporting institutions. Five years on, our sustainable business model has attracted nearly 300 supporting institutions, proving the success of its pioneering non-classical economic model, and enabling us to establish a thriving platform of 28 peer-reviewed journals.

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a scholar-led charitable organisation dedicated to publishing world-leading open access humanities scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges. Launched five years ago, our free-to-read, free-to-publish model was established to challenge the costly, limited routes to open access publication in the humanities, and find a sustainable business model to enable academic journals to publish peer-reviewed research without charges to author or reader – making world-leading research accessible to anyone.

The platform was initially funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and now, five years after its launch, entirely covers its costs by payments from its international library consortium. The international consortium of libraries comprises nearly 300 institutions including Harvard Library, Cambridge, Yale, Princeton, and many others. With this model, the OLH has expanded from 7 journals in 2015 to 28 journals in 2020, has four full-time staff, and funds two external commercial university presses (Ubiquity Press and Liverpool University Press) to convert their journals to open access. The OLH also developed and launched Janeway in 2017, its own field-leading innovative open source publishing platform developed fully in-house….”

News – The Open Library of Humanities Celebrates its 5th Birthday

“The Open Library of Humanities today celebrates its 5th anniversary since we launched our platform on 28th September 2015 with only 7 journals and 99 supporting institutions. Five years on, our sustainable business model has attracted nearly 300 supporting institutions, proving the success of its pioneering non-classical economic model, and enabling us to establish a thriving platform of 28 peer-reviewed journals.

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a scholar-led charitable organisation dedicated to publishing world-leading open access humanities scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges. Launched five years ago, our free-to-read, free-to-publish model was established to challenge the costly, limited routes to open access publication in the humanities, and find a sustainable business model to enable academic journals to publish peer-reviewed research without charges to author or reader – making world-leading research accessible to anyone.

The platform was initially funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and now, five years after its launch, entirely covers its costs by payments from its international library consortium. The international consortium of libraries comprises nearly 300 institutions including Harvard Library, Cambridge, Yale, Princeton, and many others. With this model, the OLH has expanded from 7 journals in 2015 to 28 journals in 2020, has four full-time staff, and funds two external commercial university presses (Ubiquity Press and Liverpool University Press) to convert their journals to open access. The OLH also developed and launched Janeway in 2017, its own field-leading innovative open source publishing platform developed fully in-house….”